Seminars and Colloquia, January through June, 2018


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Seminars and Colloquia, Typical Week:


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Date:Thursday
Time:1:30-3:00 PM
Place:106A Studio Room, Classroom Building, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 365, OU
& Online Access
Inquiries: joseph.haley@okstate.edu or kao@nhn.ou.edu

Physics Colloquium:

Date:Thursday
Time:3:30-4:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Inquiries: joseph.haley@okstate.edu or mario.borunda@okstate.edu

Journal Club on Statistical Mechanics and Condensed Matter Physics (Informal):

Date:Friday (bi)weekly
Time:2:30 PM
Place:PS 147
Inquiries: perk@okstate.edu or mario.borunda@okstate.edu

Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, January 1-5, 2018


No talks scheduled


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, January 8-12, 2018


No talks scheduled


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, January 15-19, 2018


Monday, January 15: Martin Luther King Day, University Holiday.

First Week of Classes


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Mario F. Borunda
Department of Physics
Oklahoma State University
Date:Thursday, January 18, 2018
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:A Tale of Two Dimensional Systems

Abstract:

In this talk, I will describe our efforts to understand how light interacts with two 2D systems: graphene and phosphorene. For this purpose, we used several ab initio computational techniques which will be reviewed here. The discovery of graphene ushered the age of 2D materials. The characterization of graphene is usually done with Raman spectroscopy. I will present our theoretical approach to understanding Raman scattering in graphene, and how we can use it to interpret the spectra. The monolayer of black phosphorous (phosphorene), is a semiconducting material that was recently discovered and holds great promise for use in electronic applications. However, phosphorene is not stable and degrades in less than an hour. I will describe how our calculations established the degradation dynamics of phosphorene.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, January 22-26, 2018


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Speaker:Dr. Howard A. Baer
Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics & Astronomy
University of Oklahoma
Date:Thursday, January 25, 2018
Time:1:30 PM
Place:106B Studio Room, Classroom Building, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 365, OU
& Online Access
Title:Higgs and Superparticle Mass Predictions from the String Theory Landscape

Abstract:

Assuming a fertile patch of the string theory landscape leading to a low energy effective theory consisting of the MSSM+hidden sector N=1, d=4 supergravity, we derive probability distributions for Higgs and sparticle masses. These predictions explain why there seems to be a m(weak)−m(susy) Little Hierarchy and why so far no SUSY signal has been seen at LHC. They also provide guidance for future accelerator and dark matter searches.

Finally, they contradict the common misconception that string theory is not predictive.


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Doerte Blume
Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Oklahoma
Date:Thursday, January 25, 2018
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Probing the Helium Dimer and Trimer with Fast, Intense Lasers

Abstract:

Helium is the only element that remains liquid under normal pressure down to zero temperature. Below 2.17K, the bosonic isotope helium-4 undergoes a phase transition to a superfluid. Motivated by this intriguing bulk behavior, the properties of finite-sized helium droplets have been studied extensively over the past 25 years or so. A number of properties of liquid helium-4 droplets are, just as those of nuclei, well described by the liquid drop model. The existence of the extremely fragile helium dimer was proven experimentally in 1994 in diffraction grating experiments. Since then, appreciable effort has gone into creating and characterizing trimers, tetramers and larger clusters. The ground state and excited state of the helium trimer are particularly interesting since these systems are candidates for Efimov states. The existence of Efimov states, which are unique due to scale invariance and an associated limit cycle, was predicted in 1971. However, till recently, Efimov states had—although their existence had been confirmed experimentally—not been imaged directly. Recently, ingenious experimental advances that utilize femtosecond lasers made it possible to directly image the static quantum mechanical density distribution of helium dimers and trimers. I will review some of these experiments and related theoretical calculations that led to the experimental detection of the excited helium trimer Efimov state. Extensions to the time domain will also be discussed. Intriguing laser-kick induced dynamics of the fragile helium dimer is observed experimentally and analyzed theoretically. These initial results open the door for future studies that probe scattering length dominated few-body systems using fast, intense lasers.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, January 29-February 2, 2018


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Allison McCarn Deiana
Department of Physics
University of Michigan
Date:Thursday, February 1, 2018
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Searches for New Particles at the ATLAS Detector and Diversity in Physics

Abstract:

Since 2015, the Large Hadron Collider has produced an unprecedented amount of proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV center-of-mass energy, and many millions of events have been recorded by the ATLAS detector.  One Higgs boson has already been observed, but the possibility remains that it’s part of a larger Higgs Sector.  In this presentation, I will discuss the motivation for and challenges in searching for an additional Higgs boson in the ATLAS Collaboration, an organization that includes physicists from many different cultures.  Though many people from around the world participate in physics research, there is a notable under-representation of women as well as members of several other groups.  The discussion of searches for new particles will be followed by an examination of the current status of diversity in physics, with consideration of steps that can be taken to increase diversity in the field and move toward a more equitable future.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Journal Club on Statistical Mechanics, Condensed Matter Physics, and Optics (Informal):

Speaker:Mr. Kyle Stoltz
Department of Physics
Oklahoma State University
Date:Friday, February 2, 2018
Time:2:30 PM
Place:PS 147
Title:Kohn–Sham Density Functional Theory

I will talk about the paper “Physical Content of the Exact Kohn–Sham Orbital Energies: Band Gaps and Derivative Discontinuities,” by J.P. Perdew and M. Levy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 51(20), 1884–1887 (1983).


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, February 5-9, 2018


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Peyman Ahmadi
Product development manager
Coherent | Nufern, East Granby, CT
Date:Thursday, February 8, 2018
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:1940 nm All-Fiber Q-Switched Fiber Laser for Medical Applications

Abstract:

We present development of a nanosecond Q-switched Tm3+-doped fiber laser with 16 W average power and 4.4 kW peak power operating at 1940 nm. The laser has a master oscillator power amplifier design, and uses large mode area Tm3+-doped fibers as the gain medium. Special techniques are developed to splice Tm3+-doped fibers to minimize splice loss. The laser design is optimized to reduce non-linear effects, including modulation instability. Pulse width broadening due to high gain is observed and studied in detail. Medical surgery is a field of application where this laser may be able to improve clinical practice. The laser together with scanning galvanometer mirrors is used to cut precisely around small footprint vessels in tissue phantoms without leaving any visible residual thermal damage. These experiments provide proof-of-principle that this laser has promising potential in the laser surgery application space.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Journal Club on Statistical Mechanics, Condensed Matter Physics, and Optics (Informal):

Speaker:Mr. Paul Smith
Department of Physics
Oklahoma State University
Date:Friday, February 9, 2017
Time:2:30 PM
Place:PS 147
Title:Replacement Manifolds: When the Stationary Phase Approximation Breaks Down

I will talk about the paper “Replacement manifolds: A method to uniformize semiclassical wave functions,” by J. Vaníček and E.J. Heller, Phys. Rev. E 64, 026215 (2001).


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, February 12-16, 2018


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Steve B. Jiang
Vice Chair, Department of Radiation Oncology
Director, Division of Medical Physics and Engineering
University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
Date:Thursday, February 15, 2018
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Artificial Intelligence in Medicine

Abstract:

The progress of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies has recently been exponential and shown to be both transformative and disruptive in many fields such as computer vision, natural language processing, audio processing, and automobile auto piloting.  AI has become the No. 1 priority for industry leaders like Google, Facebook, Apple, Amazon, Microsoft, and IBM.  AI is expected to have a significant impact on healthcare, especially in the areas of individualized and precision medicine, medical image analysis, disease diagnosis assistance, treatment solution recommendation, care delivery optimization/automation/safety, treatment outcome and toxicity prediction, patient care in resource limited regions, medical error detection and quality assurance, assisted care and chronic disease management with wearable sensors, and surgical and rehabilitation robots.  At UT Southwestern Department of Radiation Oncology medical physicists are working closely with clinicians and biologists to solve various important clinical problems in radiation therapy in specific and medicine in general.  In this talk I will introduce our AI research work at UT Southwestern.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, February 19-23, 2018


Journal Club on Statistical Mechanics, Condensed Matter Physics, and Optics (Informal):

Speaker:Dr. Jacques H.H. Perk
Department of Physics
Oklahoma State University
Date:Friday, February 23, 2017
Time:2:30 PM
Place:PS 147
Title:Quasicrystals, a Review

Quasiperiodic structures had been studied by mathematicians and even appeared decorating medieval Islamic buildings. However, when in 1982 Dan Shechtman observed a ten-fold scattering pattern from a metal alloy crystal, he was ridiculed by his colleagues who said that his observations contradicted standard texts like Kittel’s. Although initially rejected, Shechtman succeeded in publishing his findings in 1984. For this work he received the 2011 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

In the talk I shall review several theoretical developments, Shechtman’s findings and some recent technological applications. Finally, I shall show some results for the pentagrid Ising model. [This review has been published leaving out many of the pictures: H. Au-Yang and J.H.H. Perk, Indagationes Mathematicae 24 (2013) 996–1017.]


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, February 26-March 2, 2018


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Scott A. Holmstrom
Department of Physics and Engineering Physics
University of Tulsa
Date:Thursday, March 1, 2018
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:TBA

Abstract:

TBA

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, March 5-9, 2018


Week of APS March Meeting



Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, March 12-16, 2018


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Cheng Chin
Department of Physics and the James Franck Institute
University of Chicago
Date:Friday, March 16, 2018
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110 ?
Title:TBA

Abstract:

TBA

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, March 19-23, 2018


Spring Break.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, March 26-30, 2018



Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, April 2-6, 2018


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Xiaoqin Zou
Department of Physics and Astronomy
& Department of Biochemistry
University of Missouri, Columbia, MO
Date:Thursday, April 5, 2018
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:New Strategies for Studying Protein Interactions and Applications to Structure-Based Drug Design

Abstract:

One of the greatest challenges in computational biophysics is to predict interactions between biological molecules, which play critical roles in biological processes and rational design of therapeutic drugs. Biomolecular interactions involve delicate interplay between multiple interactions, including electrostatic interactions, van der Waals interactions, solvent effect, and conformational entropic effect. Accurate determination of these complex and subtle interactions is challenging. Moreover, a biological molecule such as a protein usually consists of thousands of atoms, and thus occupies a huge conformational space. The large degrees of freedom pose further challenges for accurate prediction of biomolecular interactions.

In my talk, I will present our recent development of physics-based theory and computational modeling on protein-small molecule, protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions. The major strategy is to extract microscopic energetics from the information embedded in the experimentally-determined structures of protein complexes. I will also present applications of the methods to structure-based therapeutic design.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, April 9-13, 2018



Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, April 16-20, 2018


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Shaikh Saad
Department of Physics
Oklahoma State University
Date:Thursday, April 19, 2018
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:TBA

Abstract:

TBA

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, April 23-27, 2018


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Gretchen K. Campbell
Joint Quantum Institute
Department of Physics
University of Maryland and NIST
Date:Thursday, April 26, 2018
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:TBA

Abstract:

TBA

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, April 30-May 4, 2018


Prefinals Week


Joint Physics—Microbiology and Molecular Genetics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Andreas E. Vasdekis
Department of Physics
University of Idaho, Moscow ID
Date:Thursday, May 3, 2018
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:TBA

Abstract:

TBA

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, May 7-11, 2018


Finals Week


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, May 14-18, 2018



Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, May 21-25, 2018


No talks scheduled.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, May 28-June 1, 2018


No talks scheduled.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, June 4-8, 2018


No talks scheduled.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, June 11-15, 2018


No talks scheduled.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, June 18-22, 2018


No talks scheduled.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, June 25-29, 2018


No talks scheduled.


Last Updated: .

This page was prepared by Helen Au-Yang and Jacques H.H. Perk.
jhhp@jperk.phy.okstate.edu