Seminars and Colloquia, July through December, 2018


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Seminars and Colloquia, Typical Week:


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Date:Thursday
Time:1:30-3:00 PM
Place:106A Studio Room, Classroom Building, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 365, OU
& Online Access
Inquiries: joseph.haley@okstate.edu or kao@nhn.ou.edu

Physics Colloquium:

Date:Thursday
Time:3:30-4:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Inquiries: joseph.haley@okstate.edu or mario.borunda@okstate.edu

Journal Club on Statistical Mechanics and Condensed Matter Physics (Informal):

Date:Friday (bi)weekly
Time:2:30 PM
Place:PS 147
Inquiries: perk@okstate.edu or mario.borunda@okstate.edu


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, July 2-6, 2018


No talks scheduled


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, July 9-13, 2018


No talks scheduled


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, July 16-20, 2018


No talks scheduled


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, July 23-27, 2018


No talks scheduled


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, July 30-August 3, 2018


No talks scheduled


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, August 6-10, 2018


No talks scheduled


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, August 13-17, 2018


No talks scheduled


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, August 20-24, 2018


First week of classes

No talks scheduled.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, August 27-31, 2018


Second week of classes.

No talks scheduled


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, September 3-7, 2018


Monday, September 3: Labor Day (University holiday)


Joint Chemistry Seminar/Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Patricia LiWang
Chemistry & Chemical Biology Program
School of Natural Sciences
University of California at Merced
Date:Thursday, September 6, 2018
Time:3:30 PM
Place:Room 103
Title:HIV Prevention: Biochemistry and More

Abstract:

Despite recent gains in HIV treatment, two million people per year are still being newly infected with HIV, and most of those are heterosexual women.  Sub-Saharan Africa remains particularly troubling, with clinical trials showing some prevention methods being moderately effective in mature women, but not effective in preventing infection in young women (under 25 years old).  My lab studies the structure and biochemical mechanism of protein HIV entry inhibitors.  This work has recently led us toward practical use of these inhibitors in insertable devices that could be used to protect young women from HIV infection.  The talk will cover our research in the biochemistry of two potent HIV inhibitory proteins, Griffithsin (a mannose-binding lectin that binds the surface of HIV) and 5P12-RANTES (a protein that binds the human cell surface, blocking HIV entry).  Then I will discuss how our research plan also includes the practicality of getting these inhibitors into a form that would be effective as an insertable object to prevent the sexual spread of HIV.  This involves not just inhibitory potency, but also a whole range of other concerns that are not usually encountered by a scientist, including cost and, possibly more importantly, attractiveness to the user.

Note: Refreshments will be served in Room 107 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome!


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, September 10-14, 2018


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Ramon E. Lopez
Department of Physics and Co-Director of UTeach Arlington
University of Texas at Arlington
Date:Thursday, September 13, 2018
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:The Science of Space Weather

Abstract:

As our technological civilization becomes more dependent of space technology, we become more vulnerable to changes in the space environment in which that technology functions.  These environmental changes are known as “space weather.”  In this talk I will discuss what drives space weather and how it affects human activities both in space and on the Earth.  I will also discuss recent efforts to create physics-based numerical simulations of the magnetosphere to be used in forecasting space weather.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Extra Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Ramon E. Lopez
Department of Physics and Co-Director of UTeach Arlington
University of Texas at Arlington
Date:Friday, September 14, 2018
Time:11:30 AM
Place:PS 101
Title:Some Things Physicists Have Learned about Physics Education by Doing Research in Cognitive Science

Abstract:

Education is something that concerns all faculty in university science departments.  Physics as a discipline has been a leader in taking that general concern and transforming it into a sub-discipline of the field: Physics Education Research (PER).  PER is based on cognitive science, and in fact some important aspects of cognitive science (such as studies of experts versus novices) have been done with physics as the context for the investigations.  Today, there are a number of PER groups in physics departments around the world, doing research in applied cognitive science that focuses on issues of teaching and learning physics.  These physicists are publishing papers in peer-reviewed journals, getting grants, and graduating students with Ph.D.s, just like every other area of physics.  In this talk I will touch on several findings from cognitive science that have huge implications for how we teach physics, as well as some results from PER that are leading the way in university science education across all fields.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, September 17-21, 2018


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Pere Mujal Torreblanca
Departament de Física Quàntica i Astrofísica
& Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICCUB)
Universitat de Barcelona, Spain
Date:Thursday, September 20, 2018
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Quantum Correlations and Degeneracy of Identical Bosons in a 2D Harmonic Trap

Abstract:

The system of few bosons in a 2D harmonic trap is considered, and also the N-boson case, when it is feasible [1,2,3]. The spectral properties are scrutinized and, in particular, analytic expressions are derived for the degeneracies and their breaking for the lower-energy states at small but finite interactions. We demonstrate that the degeneracy of the low-energy states is independent of the number of particles in the noninteracting limit and also for sufficiently weak interactions. In the strongly interacting regime, we show how the many-body wave function develops holes whenever two particles are at the same position in space to avoid the interaction, a mechanism reminiscent of the Tonks–Girardeau gas in 1D [3]. The evolution of the system as the interaction is increased is studied by means of the density profiles, pair correlations, and fragmentation of the ground state for N=2, 3, and 4 bosons.

  1. P. Mujal, E. Sarlé, A. Polls, B. Juliá-Díaz, Phys. Rev. A 96, 043614 (2017).
  2. P. Mujal, A. Polls, B. Juliá-Díaz, Condens. Matter 3(1), 9 (2018).
  3. T. Busch, B.-G. Englert, K. Rzazewski and M. Wilkens, Found. Phys. 28, 549 (1998).

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Journal Club on Statistical Mechanics, Condensed Matter Physics, and Optics (Informal):

Speaker:Dr. Emrah Turgut
Department of Physics
Oklahoma State University
Date:Friday, September 21, 2018
Time:12:30 PM
Place:PS 147
Title:Out-of-Equilibrium Dynamics in Magnetic Solid-State Systems

Abstract:

We all know that magnetic materials lose their magnetization at high temperatures that called Curie temperature. In this classical-physics experiment, subsystems in these magnetic materials, including charge, spin, and lattice, are in equilibrium. In other words, they all have the same temperature. On the other hand, recently developed ultrafast laser pulses with few-fs pulse duration allow to drive these subsystems out-of-equilibrium and have different temperatures to each subsystem. These temperatures can have a completely distinct transient behavior until the system reaches to the equilibrium. Then, the question becomes that how the magnetization follows all different temperatures of charge, spin, and lattice systems. Even, we can ask that if a temperature of such non-equilibrium states is a valid description of a complicated picture of correlated solid-state systems. This concept also appears in storage and logic applications about how fast a nanomagnet can switch in a controllable way. After introducing the concept, I will talk about a couple of experiments in pure elements and magnetic alloys and multilayers to show how different nanoscale configurations drastically alter our fundamental understanding of non-equilibrium physics in magnetic materials. Finally, I will briefly mention our future interests to use these transient techniques to unveil mysteries properties in novel materials.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, September 24-28, 2018


Chemistry Department Seminar:

Speaker:Dr. Tak-Sing Wong
Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering
and Materials Research Institute
Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
Date:Thursday, September 27, 2018
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 103
Title:Nature Inspired Liquid-Engineered Materials

Abstract:

Natural organisms have often served as blueprints for the design of highly functional engineered materials. From the Nepenthes pitcher plant to biological cell membranes, liquids or liquid-like materials have been utilized by biological species for various important functions ranging from liquid repellency to selective filtration. In this seminar, I will discuss two classes of nature-inspired functional materials enabled by the unique properties of liquids: Slippery Liquid-Infused Porous Surfaces (SLIPS) and self-healing liquid membranes. SLIPS is modelled after the slippery rim of a Nepenthes pitcher plant, which has resolved the longstanding limitations of the conventional lotus-leaf-inspired liquid repellent materials in repelling various simple and complex liquids, as well as resisting fouling from bacteria to blood and ice. Self-healing liquid membranes — inspired by the cellular phagocytosis — enable reverse particle filtration which cannot be accomplished by any conventional solid-based membrane technologies. Perspectives on how these nature-inspired liquid-based materials may impact future applications in materials, energy, water, and health will be discussed.

Note: Coffee will be served in PS 105 at 3:00 pm.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, October 1-5, 2018


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Don W. Carona
Department of Physics & Astronomy
Texas A&M University
Date:Thursday, October 4, 2018
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Texas A&M University, Physics & Astronomy Teaching Observatory:
An Overview of Facilities, Education, Research and Outreach Programs

Abstract:

An astronomical observatory of any nature can greatly improve the academic experience. The history of the Teaching Observatory begins in 1973 with the first permanent observing structure used by students to observe the night sky. I will discuss the growth of the observing facilities and equipment and how it has impacted astronomical education and research. Our long history of outreach to the community will also be discussed in relation to its impact on state and local academic programs.

See also the following news article.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, October 8-12, 2018


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Speaker:Dr. Doreen Wackeroth
Department of Physics
University at Buffalo, State University of New York
Date:Thursday, October 11, 2018
Time:1:30 PM
Place:PS 147, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 365, OU
& Online Access
Title:Selected Topics in Electroweak Physics

Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, October 15-19, 2018


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Speaker:Dr. Angela M. Burger
Department of Physics
Oklahoma State University
Date:Thursday, October 18, 2018
Time:1:30 PM
Place:PS 147, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 365, OU
& Online Access
Title:Measurement of Vector Boson Polarisation in WZ Production at the LHC with the ATLAS Detector

Abstract:

A measurement of the WZ diboson production, using leptonic decays of the bosons, is presented.  The measurement uses data from proton-proton collisions with an integrated luminosity of 36.1 fb−1 at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 13 TeV collected in 2015 and 2016 by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC.  WZ events can be produced via a channel containing a triple-gauge boson coupling vertex, the coupling strength is given by the Standard Model.  Any deviation from the Standard Model couplings could be visible in a precise measurement of the WZ production cross section.  This talk features as well the first measurement of the boson polarisation in pair-produced events in hadronic collisions using angular distributions of the boson decay products.


Friday, October 19: Students’ Fall Break (No Classes)


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, October 22-26, 2018



Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, October 29-November 2, 2018


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Speaker:Dr. Joseph Zennamo
Neutrino Division, Fermilab
Date:Thursday, November 1, 2018
Time:1:30 PM
Place:PS 147, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 365, OU
& Online Access
Title:TBA

Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Joseph Zennamo
Neutrino Division, Fermilab
Oklahoma State University
Date:Thursday, November 1, 2018
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Discovering the Undetectable: (Sterile) Neutrino Oscillations

Abstract:

Since their discovery in 1956 neutrinos have remained an enigma. Proposed in 1930 to explain the energy spectrum of electrons emerging from nuclear decays it was not until 1998 that they were discovered to be massive. The difficulty of studying neutrinos is driven by the fact that they rarely interact, requiring large detectors and intense sources. This colloquium will discuss the continued puzzles which neutrinos provide us.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, November 5-9, 2018


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Speaker:Dr. David Curtin
Department of Physics
University of Toronto
Date:Thursday, November 8, 2018
Time:1:30 PM
Place:PS 147, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 365, OU
& Online Access
Title:TBA

Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, November 12-16, 2018


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Speaker:Dr. Huaike Guo
Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Oklahoma
Date:Thursday, November 15, 2018
Time:1:30 PM
Place:PS 147, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 365, OU
& Online Access
Title:TBA

Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, November 19-23, 2018


Thanksgiving: University holiday, Thursday-Friday, November 22-23


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, November 26-30, 2018



Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, December 3-7, 2018


Prefinals Week


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, December 10-14, 2018


Finals Week


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, December 17-21, 2018


No talks scheduled


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, December 24-28, 2018


No talks scheduled


Last Updated:

This page was prepared by Helen Au-Yang and Jacques H.H. Perk.
jhhp@jperk.phy.okstate.edu