Seminars and Colloquia, January through June, 2016


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Seminars and Colloquia, Typical Week:


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Date:Thursday
Time:1:30-3:00 PM
Place:106 B Studio Room, Classroom Building, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 103, OU
Inquiries: joseph.haley@okstate.edu or kao@nhn.ou.edu

Physics Colloquium:

Date:Thursday
Time:3:30-4:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Inquiries: girish.agarwal@okstate.edu or perk@okstate.edu

Journal Club on Statistical Mechanics and Condensed Matter Physics, and Optics (Informal):

Date:Friday (bi)weekly
Time:2:30 PM
Place:PS 147
Inquiries: perk@okstate.edu or girish.agarwal@okstate.edu or mario.borunda@okstate.edu

Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, January 4-8, 2016


No talks scheduled


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, January 11-15, 2016


First Week of Classes


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, January 18-22, 2016


Martin Luther King Day: Monday, January 18


Second Week of Classes


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, January 25-29, 2016


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Stephen Hughes
Department of Physics, Engineering Physics & Astronomy
Stirling Hall, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada
Date:Thursday, January 28, 2016
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Quantum Optical Effects in “Slow-Light” Photonic Crystal Waveguides

Abstract:

Photonic crystal waveguides are periodic semiconductors for light that can control and mold the flow of photons in ways that are not possible in conventional optics. A plethora of novel light-matter interactions regimes are made possible by structurally engineering the vacuum of light with periodicity: light slows down and can be completely stopped (at least theoretically!), electromagnetic field strengths increase dramatically, and photons begin to behave quantum mechanically with unidirectional control. This talk will describe the world of light-matter interactions and quantum optics in slow-light photonic crystal waveguides, with a focus on hybrid quantum dot (artificial atom)-photonic crystal systems. I will describe the underlying physics of enhanced light-matter interactions in these open cavity structures, and give examples where one can uncontrollably emit “single photons” on a chip and create spin photon entanglers using the remarkable chiral properties of the nanoconfined light fields.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, February 1-5, 2016


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Christopher J. Crick
Department of Computer Science
Oklahoma State University
Date:Thursday, February 4, 2016
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Shared Autonomy for Human-Robot Teams

Abstract:

We are developing mechanisms for sharing information, beliefs and intentions among human-robot teams in order to produce behavior that is much more flexible and powerful than can be attained either by direct human teleoperation (the current state of the art in real-world robotics) or by fully autonomous robots (which will remain out of reach in complex applications for a while yet).  We wish to enable teams of heterogenous robots to engage in learned behaviors which are robust to dynamic and complex environments.  Crucially, this derives from a socially-sensitive working relationship with human partners, where information can be communicated succinctly and appropriately, and human advice and control can be incorporated seamlessly into the intentions of otherwise-autonomous robots.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Condensed Matter Physics Seminar:

Speaker:Dr. Toby L. Nelson
Department of Chemistry
Oklahoma State University
Date:Friday, February 5, 2016
Time:1:30 PM
Place:PS 148, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 103, OU
Title:Design and Synthesis of Organic Semiconductors:
From Transistor Paint to Eumelanin-Inspired Organic Materials

Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, February 8-12, 2016


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Speaker:Dr. Josu Cantero García
Department of Physics
Oklahoma State University
Date:Thursday, February 11, 2016
Time:1:30 PM
Place:PS 148, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 103, OU
& Online Access
Title:Photon + Jet and the b-Quark Mass

Abstract:

In this talk I will present the ATLAS measurement of the photon + jet production at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV data. In addition, a study on the determination of the b-quark pole mass exploiting the angular screening effects in the ATLAS b-jet shape data will be shown.

References:

  1. ATLAS collaboration, G. Aad et al., Dynamics of isolated-photon plus jet production in pp collisions at ps = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector. Nucl. Phys. B 875 (2013) 483-535.
  2. J. Cantero, J. Llorente, Determination of the b-quark mass mb from the angular screening effects in the ATLAS b-jet shape data. Nucl. Phys. B 889 (2014) 401-418.

Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Douglas Natelson
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Rice University
Date:Thursday, February 11, 2016
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:How Does Heating Work at the Molecular Scale?

Abstract:

When a wire is connected across a battery, energy is transferred from the macroscopic electrochemical potential difference of the battery terminals to the disorganized, microscopic degrees of freedom of the electrons and vibrational motions of the wire constituents.  How does this process work when the critical part of the “wire” consists of only a few atoms?  Atomic- and molecular scale junctions enable experiments to examine quantum systems driven far from equilibrium.  I will present measurements of shot noise and single-molecule Raman scattering in such junctions, experiments that provide information about the evolution of the local electronic and vibrational distributions in biased junctions.  I will discuss the implications of the data and prospects for future investigations of more complex quantum systems away from equilibrium.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, February 15-19, 2016


Research Week:

For program see ResearchWeek.okstate.edu.


Physics Colloquium:

Cancelled.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, February 22-26, 2016


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Speaker:Dr. Flera Rizatdinova
Department of Physics
Oklahoma State University
Date:Thursday, February 25, 2016
Time:1:30 PM
Place:PS 148, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 103, OU
& Online Access
Title:Standard Model and Top Quark Physics Results from the ATLAS Experiment

Condensed Matter Physics Seminar:

Speaker:Dr. Sangwoo S. Chung
Department of Physics
University of Cincinnati
Date:Friday, February 26, 2016
Time:1:30 PM
Place:PS 148, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 103, OU
Title:Continuous Matrix Product States for Spin-1/2 Fermions

Abstract:

Recently, we have proposed a novel implementation of a matrix-product ansatz for fermions in a 1D continuum, which correctly predicts the ground state properties of a homogeneous interacting spin-1/2 system. This includes the signatures of a partially polarized regime, in agreement with a large amount of theoretical work which has guided, and/or has been inspired by, recent cold-atom experiments. We have extended that effort to explore a more general system, having both spin- and mass-imbalance. With mass-imbalance, there is no exact solution for the Gaudin–Yang Hamiltonian, and this is one of the first applications of the fermionic cMPS on non-integrable systems.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, February 29-March 4, 2016


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Vinod M. Menon
Laboratory for Nano and Micro Photonics
Department of Physics
City College of New York
Date:Thursday, March 3, 2016
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Photonic Hypercrystals: New media for control of light-matter interaction

Abstract:

The interaction of light with matter can be manipulated by controlling the photonic density of states (PDOS). In this talk I will present some of our recent results on photonic structures that enhance PDOS and its implications for enhancement of spontaneous emission rate, and control of the strength of interaction between light and excitons. I will begin with a discussion of hyperbolic metamaterials where the topology of the iso-frequency surface is engineered to control PDOS and realize broadband enhancement in spontaneous emission [1,2]. Following this, I will discuss the concept of photonic hypercrystals (PHCs) that combine the large PDOS in metamaterials with the light scattering efficiency of photonic crystals. PHCs are distinct from photonic crystals, as both material scales involved—the hypercrystal period and the unit cells of its material components—are sub-wavelength. And they are also not metamaterials, as their electromagnetic response is qualitatively different from the expected averaged behavior. I will present our recent results on simultaneous broadband enhancement of spontaneous emission rate (×20) and out-coupling (×100) from quantum dots embedded in a PHC structure [3]. Such designer photonic media with complete control over the dispersive properties provide a new platform for broadband control of light-matter interaction. Finally, time permitting, I will discuss some potential applications.

  1. H. Krishnmoorthy et al., Science 336, 205 (2012).
  2. T. Galfsky et al., Optica 2, 62 (2015).
  3. T. Galfsky et al., arXiv:1506.01132 (2015).

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, March 7-11, 2016


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Speaker:Dr. Shreyashi Chakdar
Department of Physics
University of Virginia
Date:Thursday, March 10, 2016
Time:1:30 PM
Place:PS 148, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 103, OU
& Online Access
Title:The Search for “Mirror” Quarks with Distinguished Signatures at the 13 TeV LHC

Abstract:

Observation of non-zero neutrino masses at a scale ∼10−1–10−2 eV is a major problem in otherwise highly successful Standard Model. The most elegant mechanism to explain such tiny neutrino masses is the seesaw mechanism with right handed neutrinos. However, the required seesaw scale is so high (∼1014 GeV), it will not have any direct collider implications. Recently, in our explicit model the seesaw mechanism with the right handed neutrinos at the electroweak scale has been investigated. The model has a mirror symmetry having both the left and right lepton and quark doublets and singlets for the same SU(2)W gauge symmetry. Additional Higgs multiplets have been introduced to satisfy the precision electroweak tests, and other low energy observables. Because the scale of the symmetry breaking is electroweak, both the mirror quarks and mirror leptons have masses in the electroweak scale in the range ∼150–800 GeV. The mirror quarks/leptons decay to ordinary quarks/leptons plus almost massless neutral scalars. We calculate the final state signals arising from the pair productions of these mirror quarks and their subsequent decays. We find that these signals are well observable over the Standard Model background for 13 TeV LHC. Depending on the associated Yukawa couplings, these decays can also give rise to displaced vertices with long decay length (very different from the usual displaced vertices associated with b decays), which will be the distinguished signatures for this model.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, March 14-18, 2016


Student’s Spring Break


APS March Meeting


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, March 21-25, 2016


School of Electrical and Computer Engineering Distinguished Seminar Series:

Speaker:Dr. Hong Liu
Charles and Jean Smith Chair, Department of Biomedical Engineering,
George Lynn Cross Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
& Director of Advanced Medical Imaging Core Facility
University of Oklahoma
Date:Tuesday, March 22, 2016
Time:12:30 PM
Place:ATRC 102
Title:Phase Sensitive X-ray Imaging for Cancer Diagnosis

Abstract:

Radiography is one of the important imaging techniques in medicine. Conventional radiography is principally based on x-ray tissue attenuations. However, x-ray contrast can also be obtained from phase-changes. Several advanced methods are currently under investigation to image phase variations. Among them, the in-line phase sensitive x-ray imaging technique has demonstrated its clinical potential, as it can be implemented with polychromatic sources. The in-line phase-sensitive x-ray imaging measures the Laplacian of phase, leading to improved feature visualizations through edge enhancement. Furthermore, the technique allows the retrieval of tissue’s phase map, potentially enables quantitative tumor characterization. In this presentation, the basic principles of medical x-ray imaging will be introduced. The development of innovative phase-sensitive x-ray imaging prototypes; as well its clinical applications in breast cancer diagnosis will be discussed.


Joint Chemistry and Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Richard N. Zare
Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor in Natural Science
Department of Chemistry
Stanford University
Date:Friday, March 25, 2016
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 141
Title:Mass Spectrometry, Drop by Drop

Abstract:

Using high-resolution mass spectrometry, we have studied the synthesis of isoquinoline in a charged electrospray droplet and the complexation between cytochrome c and maltose in a fused droplet to investigate the feasibility of droplets to drive reactions (both covalent and noncovalent interactions) at a faster rate than that observed in conventional bulk solution. In both cases we found marked acceleration of reaction, by a factor of a million or more in the former and a factor of a thousand or more in the latter. We believe that carrying out reactions in microdroplets (about 1 – 15 μm in diameter corresponding to 0.5 pL – 2 nL) is a general method for increasing reaction rates. The mechanism is not presently established but droplet evaporation and droplet confinement of reagents appear to be two important factors among others. In the case of fused water droplets, evaporation has been shown to be almost negligible during the flight time from where droplet fusion occurs and the droplets enter the heated capillary inlet of the mass spectrometer. This suggests that (1) evaporation is not responsible for the acceleration process in aqueous droplet fusion and (2) the droplet-air interface may play a significant role in accelerating the reaction. We argue that this ‘microdroplet chemistry’ could be a remarkable alternative to accelerate slow and difficult reactions, and in conjunction with mass spectrometry, it may provide a new arena for studying chemical and biochemical reactions in a confined environment. We have also used desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to capture and identify fleeting electrochemical reaction intermediates and recent studies utilizing this ambient ionization technique will be presented.

Note: The presentation is followed by a reception (5 PM) and dinner (5:30 PM) in the Sequoyah Room in the Student Union. See the Physics Office (PS-145) to purchase tickets for this ΦΛΥ Banquet (Students $10.00 and Faculty $25.00).

PLU Banquet Dinner Talk:

Speaker:Dr. Richard N. Zare
Title:Mass Spectrometry Imaging in the Service of Human Health

Abstract:

This talk will describe recent work to use desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI) to distinguish between cancer and benign tissue regions and to grade cancerous tumors. A thin slice of tissue is mounted on an XY translation stage and bombarded by microdroplets that can dissolve lipids and other small-molecule metabolites. The resulting splash enters a high-resolution mass spectrometer allowing us to general a chemical map with an approximate resolution of 200 microns per pixel. The interpretation of the chemical map uses primarily the lasso regression technique, which minimizes the usual sum of squared errors, with a bound on the sum of the absolute values of the coefficients. The results are compared to standard histopathologic determinations.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, March 28-April 1, 2016


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Speaker:Mr. Shaikh Saad
Department of Physics
Oklahoma State University
Date:Thursday, March 31, 2016
Time:1:30 PM
Place:PS 148, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 103, OU
& Online Access
Title:Anarchy in Unified Theory

Abstract:

The concept of anarchy seems to agree very well with the observed neutrino data. In this work extension of this concept in the charged fermion sector is considered in addition to the neutrino sector. Two different models are considered, one model which is based on SU(5)-GUT (grand unified theory) and the other one is based on anomalous U(1)-flavor symmetry. The structure of the mass matrices of these models come as different combinations of both symmetric and anarchic parts and the number of parameters are only 3 and 1 respectively other than the order one coefficients. Our statistical approach focuses on the likelihood of these classes of models to reproduce the experimentally observed fermion masses and mixings. With this small number of parameters, we show that models that belong to these two classes can nicely reproduce all the observables in the charged fermion and neutrino sectors on average. We apply two different Monte Carlo analyses, one with unbiased and the other one with biased Gaussian distributions of random variables and compare the outcomes of the two approaches.


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Mark Akselrod
Chief Scientist, Executive Manager
Stillwater Crystal Growth Division
Landauer, Stillwater, OK
Date:Thursday, March 31, 2016
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Latest Progress in Fluorescent Nuclear Track Detector Technology:
Crystals, instrumentation, image processing and applications

Abstract:

The next technological breakthrough in tools for medical dosimetry, radiobiology and radiation protection was achieved with Fluorescent Nuclear Track detectors (FNTD) that has some important advantages in measuring neutron, high energy heavy charge particles (HCP) and photon fields. New detectors are made of luminescent carbon- and, magnesium-doped aluminum oxide single crystals (Al2O3:C,Mg) having complex luminescent aggregate defects. FNTD imaging instrumentation is based on confocal laser scanning fluorescent microscopy and novel image processing technique. The results of latest experiments in neutron detection, LET spectroscopy of HCPs, fragmentation, 2D and 3D imaging of particles and synchrotron microbeams will be presented. Special attention will be dedicated to the possible use of FNTD crystals in terabyte capacity volumetric optical data storage, as a radiobiology research tool and QA tool in proton and carbon-ion radiotherapy.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, April 4-8, 2016


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Georges El Fakhri
Director, Gordon Center for Medical Imaging
Department of Radiology
Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School
Date:Thursday, April 7, 2016
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:PET/CT and PET/MR in Proton Therapy

Abstract:

In this talk we discuss several components of our ongoing imaging efforts in radiotherapy including In-room PET/CT verification of proton therapy including recent development in the use of PET for assessing positron range and response to treatment, as well as PET/MR/MRS in guiding proton therapy treatment of soft tissue sarcoma, assessing response to treatment and future directions in multimodality imaging in Radiotherapy.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Special Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Eite Tiesinga
Joint Quantum Institute, Atomic Physics Division
National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD
Date:Friday, April 8, 2016
Time:11:00 AM
Place:PS 147
Title:Laser-Cooled Atoms and Their Uses in Clocks and Quantum Simulations

Abstract:

I have long-term interests in the physics of laser-cooled, ultra-cold atoms.  So far the most important application of atoms at micro- and nano-kelvin temperatures is in atomic clocks and time and frequency standards.  Here, the goal to isolate just one atom, not affected by its environment or other atoms.  On the other hand their collisions or interactions are crucial in collective, many-body systems in which, most dramatically, we can simulate (quantum) phase transitions, such as those to and from superfluidity.

In this presentation I will introduce ultra-cold atoms and describe our research into atomic collisions and explain the role of quantum- or wave-mechanics in these collisions.  In particular, I will touch upon the unique ability to vary the cross section or diameter of atoms over several orders of magnitude (where micron-sized atoms have been observed).  I conclude by describing a proposal for the detection of Cooper pairing between fermionic atoms in optical lattices, laser-generated periodic potentials for atoms.


Condensed Matter Physics Seminar:

Speaker:Dr. Matthew P. Lumb
Program on Photovoltaic Research and Developments
George Washington University
& Naval Research Laboratory
Date:Friday, February 26, 2016
Time:1:30 PM
Place:PS 148, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 103, OU
Title:Pushing the Boundaries of Multi-Junction Solar Cell Efficiency

Abstract:

99% of the power from the sun reaching the surface of Earth is contained between the wavelengths of 250-2500 nm. To date, the most efficient way to convert those photons to electricity is to split the spectrum into smaller bands, achieved using multi-junction solar cells comprising the III-V material system. However, no single substrate can accommodate III-V alloys capable of capturing the entire spectrum from 250-2500 nm, resulting in reduced conversion efficiency due to the incomplete use of the available photons and/or excessive thermalization losses due to suboptimal splitting of the solar photons by available III-V alloys. In this talk, I will present work on overcoming this limitation by achieving heterogeneous integration with transfer printing, used to assemble high performance materials grown on dissimilar substrates to make almost limitlessly flexible multi-junction solar cell combinations. I will present the latest device results for III-V solar cells grown on a range of substrates and the challenges and lessons learned from their assembly. Finally, I will discuss MOSAIC, an exciting new project aiming to build a record-breaking, state of the art solar array using transfer printed solar cells with a potentially disruptive technological impact.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, April 11-15, 2016


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Speaker:Dr. Peter U.E. Onyisi
Department of Physics
University of Texas at Austin
Date:Thursday, April 14, 2016
Time:1:30 PM
Place:PS 148, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 103, OU
& Online Access
Title:Studying the Top Quark-Higgs Boson Coupling at ATLAS

Abstract:

The Higgs boson’s coupling to the top quark, the top Yukawa coupling, is enormous and yet is so far primarily measured indirectly through loop-induced processes.  The associated production of a top quark pair and a Higgs boson (ttH) provides an independent measurement of this coupling using a tree-level process, which allows us to constrain (or observe) potential physics beyond the Standard Model.  In addition, non-Standard Model-like top quark-Higgs interactions are poorly constrained by low-energy measurements compared to those of lighter quarks, and there is significant scope to observe, for example, flavor-changing neutral currents.  I will discuss ATLAS searches for ttH production and limits on the t → Hq branching fraction using LHC Run 1 data.


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Peter U.E. Onyisi
Department of Physics
University of Texas at Austin
Date:Thursday, April 14, 2016
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:The Higgs Boson in 2016

Abstract:

The Higgs boson was the last piece of the Standard Model of Particle Physics to be discovered, less than four years ago.  Since its observation, a huge amount of information about the particle has been collected, in an effort to verify its identity and search for unexpected behavior.  I will discuss the techniques we use to study the Higgs boson, results that have been obtained so far, and outstanding questions that we expect to be answered by the Large Hadron Collider experiments in the future.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, April 18-22, 2016


No talks scheduled.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, April 25-29, 2016


Prefinals Week


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Lichao Zhao
Department of Physics
Oklahoma State University
Date:Thursday, April 28, 2016
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Antiferromagnetic Spinor Bose–Einstein Condensates in Two-Dimensional and Three-Dimensional Optical Lattices

Abstract:

An optical lattice is a versatile technique to enhance interatomic interactions and control the mobility of atoms. A spinor Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) confined in optical lattices has attracted much attention for its abilities to systematically study, verify, and optimize condensed matter models. We have experimentally demonstrated that spin dynamics and the phase diagram of spinor BECs can be conveniently tuned by a two-dimensional optical lattice. We have also achieved the first experimental realization of first-order superfluid to Mott-insulator quantum phase transitions in an antiferromagnetic spinor BEC trapped by three-dimensional optical lattices. The observed signatures include hysteresis effect and significant heating across the phase transitions. The nature of the phase transitions is found to strongly depend on the ratio of the quadratic Zeeman energy to the spin-dependent interaction. Our observations are qualitatively understood by the mean field theory, and in addition suggest tuning the quadratic Zeeman energy is a novel approach to realize superfluid to Mott-insulator phase transitions.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Condensed Matter Physics Seminar:

Speaker:Dr. Rudro R. Biswas
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Purdue University
Date:Friday, April 29, 2016
Time:2:30 PM
Place:PS 148, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 103, OU
Title:Uncovering the Geometry of Quantum Hall States

Abstract:

Exotic topological states of matter, of which quantum Hall (QH) states are a prominent example, have attracted considerable theoretical and experimental efforts in recent years, both due to their potential for enabling transformative technologies, and since foundational questions about the internal geometry of these states have remained open. The signature property of QH states, namely, the quantization of Hall conductance, is well-appreciated, and independent of sample-specific details, to the extent that it is used for precise measurements of fundamental constants. Less well understood, and at the frontier of current research, is how the geometry of these states responds to gravitational perturbations, i.e., deformations to the real space manifold they are embedded in, and what if any universal signatures characterize this response. In this talk I shall first review the history of the quantum Hall effect, and then focus on this frontier question. I will show that remarkable new universal behaviors emerge from probing the gravitational response of QH states. Further, I will show that the these responses can be characterized not only by considering QH states in curved spaces, but equivalently, by placing them in non-uniform electric fields, thus facilitating experimental tests of these results. Finally, I will discuss technological implications of these results, and the prescription that they suggest for constructing qubits for quantum computation.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, May 2-6, 2016


Finals Week


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Robert B. Hayes
Department of Nuclear Engineering
North Carolina State University
Date:Thursday, May 5, 2016
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110?
Title:An Overview of Nuclear Forensics and Security

Abstract:

The Consortium for Nonproliferation Enabling Capabilities (CNEC) at North Carolina State University (NCSU) brings together the modern R&D support provided by the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).  The presentation will review NCSU/CNEC and its support of external university research in the field of nuclear security around the country.  After this, the DOE/NNSA assets and applications in nuclear security will be given.  These will include all the basic features of emergency response as well as nonproliferation, arms control and attribution.  The basic physics underlying most nuclear forensics applications will conclude the presentation.

Bio:

The author is a Fellow of the American Physical Society having a PhD in Nuclear Engineering and a MS in Physics.  He is also a Certified Health Physicist by the American Board of Health Physics and is a Licensed Professional Nuclear Engineer in both New Mexico and Nevada.  He is currently an Associate Professor of Nuclear Engineering at North Carolina State University where he teaches nuclear radiation and reactor fundamentals.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, May 9-13, 2016


No talks scheduled.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, May 16-20, 2016



Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, May 23-27, 2016



Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, May 30-June 3, 2016



Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, June 6-10, 2016



Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, June 13-17, 2016



Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, June 20-24, 2016



Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, June 27-July 1, 2016



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jhhp@jperk.phy.okstate.edu