Seminars and Colloquia, January through June, 2019


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Seminars and Colloquia, Typical Week:


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Date:Thursday
Time:1:30-3:00 PM
Place:106 B Studio Room, Classroom Building, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 103, OU
Inquiries: joseph.haley@okstate.edu or kao@nhn.ou.edu

Physics Colloquium:

Date:Thursday
Time:3:30-4:30 PM
Place:PS 101
Inquiries: joseph.haley@okstate.edu or mario.borunda@okstate.edu

Journal Club on Statistical Mechanics and Condensed Matter Physics, and Optics (Informal):

Date:Friday (bi)weekly
Time:2:00 PM
Place:PS 147
Inquiries: perk@okstate.edu or mario.borunda@okstate.edu

Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, January 1-4, 2019


No talks scheduled


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, January 7-11, 2019


No talks scheduled


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, January 14-18, 2019


First Week of Classes


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, January 21-25, 2019


Second Week of Classes

Monday, January 21, 2019: Martin Luther King Day


Journal Club on Statistical Mechanics, Condensed Matter Physics, and Optics (Informal):

Speaker:Mr. Kyle Stoltz
Department of Physics
Oklahoma State University
Date:Friday, January 25, 2019
Time:1:00 PM
Place:PS 147
Title:CO Binding on the Stable Surfaces of ZnO

Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, January 28-February 1, 2019


No talks scheduled


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, February 4-8, 2019


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Speaker:Dr. Ian M. Lewis
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
Date:Thursday, February 7, 2019
Time:1:30 PM
Place:PS 147, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 365, OU
& Online Access
Title:Shedding light on Top Partners

Women in Physics Seminar:

Speaker:Dr. Kelly L. Nash
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Texas at San Antonio
Date:Friday, February 8, 2019
Time:Postponed till later date
Title:Communication and Negotiation Skills Seminar for Women

Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, February 11-15, 2019


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Xiao-Feng Qian
Institute of Optics, and Department of Physics & Astronomy
University of Rochester, Rochester, NY
Date:Monday, February 11, 2019
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Quantum-Classical Links in Optics:
Entanglement, Coherence, Information and More

Abstract:

The issue of connection and boundary between quantum and classical is of great fundamental and practical importance. It has always been one of the leading topics in physics research ever since the born of quantum mechanics. The field of quantum information science is one of the most prevailing modern examples as an effort of searching and utilizing connections between quantum and classical information [1]. Fantastic applications in various subfields such as quantum computing, quantum communication, quantum cryptography have been proposed and extensively explored in the past few decades. Remarkably, new links beyond information, are emerging. Recently, it has been demonstrated in detail that properties such as entanglement, coherence, etc., that are widely considered as uniquely quantum, can also be found to exist in classical optical fields [2]. This new emerging field can be called “Classically Entangled Optics”, and it has stimulated various intriguing theoretical and experimental examinations. Both fundamental issues (e.g., Bell violation, wave-particle duality, optical polarization theory, hidden coherence) and practical applications (e.g., optical metrology, optical sensing, analog of teleportation) based on this new recognition are being actively investigated [2]. It is amazing that even a century after the birth of quantum mechanics, new issues of quantum-classical links are still emerging.

In this talk, I will discuss my recent research work in the perspective of quantum-classical links through way of the emerging field “Classically Entangled Optics”. A brief introduction of this field is given explaining quantum-classical analogs in optics. It is then followed by a detailed discussion of our recent advances in the investigation of Bohr’s complementarity [3] as an illustration of how fundamental concepts such as entanglement, coherence, wave-particle duality, etc., find their places both in classical coherence optics [4] and in quantum single photons [5]. A brief outlook of my research will also be discussed in extending the traditional coherence optics theory and in applying quantum information science concepts to coherence optics.

  1. M.A. Nielsen and I.L. Chuang, Quantum Computation and Quantum Information, Cambridge Univ. Press, (2000).
  2. See a brief overview in X.-F. Qian, A. N. Vamivakas, and J.H. Eberly, “Emerging Connections: Classical and Quantum Optics”, Optics & Photonics News, 28 (10), 34-41 (2017).
  3. N. Bohr, Naturwissenschaften 16, 245 (1928); “The Quantum Postulate and the Recent Development of Atomic Theory,” Nature 121, 580 (1928).
  4. X.-F. Qian, A.N. Vamivakas, and J.H. Eberly, “Entanglement limits duality and vice versa”, Optica 5, 942 (2018); J. H. Eberly, X.-F. Qian, and A. N. Vamivakas, “Polarization coherence theorem,” Optica 4, 1113-1114 (2017).
  5. X.-F. Qian, K. Konthasinghe, S. K. Manikandan, D. Spiecker, A. N. Vamivakas, and J. H. Eberly, “Coherence without Complementarity”, submitted to Nature (2019); X.-F. Qian and G. S. Agarwal, “Are Quantum Objects Born with Duality?”, submitted to Physical Review Letters (2019).

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Viktoriia E. Babicheva
College of Optical Sciences
University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ
Date:Thursday, February 14, 2019
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:van der Waals Meta-Optics

Abstract:

Optical metamaterials are three-dimensional structures with rationally designed building blocks that enable devices with distinct optical responses not attainable with naturally available materials. Comprising a class of metamaterials with reduced dimensionality, optical metasurfaces allow the miniaturization of conventional refractive optics into planar structures, and a novel planar technology is expected to provide enhanced functionality for photonic devices being distinctly different from those observed in the three-dimensional case. In this talk, I will show that nanostructures made of high-index materials, such as silicon, transition metal dichalcogenides, or hexagonal boron nitride, support optically induced both electric and magnetic resonances in the visible and infrared spectral ranges. I will present the results on antireflective properties of metasurfaces based on high-index nanoparticle arrays and explain how zero backward scattering from the highly reflective substrate can be achieved [1]. The recent discovery of high-index materials that offer low loss and tunability in their optical properties as well as complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatibility can enable a breakthrough in the field of nanophotonics, optical metamaterials, and their applications.

  1. V.E. Babicheva and A.B. Evlyukhin, “Resonant Lattice Kerker Effect in Metasurfaces with Electric and Magnetic Optical Responses,” Laser & Photonics Reviews 11, 1700132 (2017).
  2. V.E. Babicheva and J.V. Moloney, “Lattice Zenneck modes on subwavelength antennas,” Laser & Photonics Reviews 12, 1800267 (2019).

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Journal Club on Statistical Mechanics, Condensed Matter Physics, and Optics (Informal):

Speaker:Mr. Sreekul Raj Rajagopal
Department of Physics
Oklahoma State University
Date:Friday, February 15, 2019
Time:1:00 PM
Place:PS 147
Title:Enhanced Absorption Sensing Using a Non-adiabatic Tapered Fiber Coupling to a Whispering Gallery Microresonator

Abstract:

Adiabatically tapered fibers are often used to excite whispering gallery modes (WGMs) of microresonators used as chemical sensors.  Recently it was demonstrated that using a non-adiabatic tapered fiber can enhance refractive index sensing.  The incoming light is distributed between fundamental and higher-order fiber modes, whereas only the fundamental mode is detected because the uptaper is adiabatic.  The interference effect between these fiber modes when exciting a WGM leads to the sensitivity enhancement.  We have shown theoretically that even greater enhancement is possible for absorption sensing.  For a given WGM, the predicted enhancement can be calculated by measuring the throughput power when the two fiber modes are in and out of phase at the input.  Enhancement can be confirmed by sending the light in the reverse direction through the asymmetrically tapered fiber so that only one fiber mode is incident on the microresonator.  Using a carefully designed asymmetrically tapered fiber, we have demonstrated this enhancement in experiments using a hollow bottle resonator (HBR) with an internal analyte.  Absorption in the analyte causes a change in the WGM throughput fractional dip depth; these changes were studied with varying analyte concentration for forward and reverse propagation to evaluate the absorption sensitivityi.  For both liquid and gaseous analytes, our measured sensitivity enhancements are not inconsistent with the predicted enhancements of at least a factor of 100.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, February 18-22, 2019


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Shouvik Chatterjee
California NanoSystems Institute
University of California at Santa Barbara
Date:Monday, February 18, 2019
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Shining Light on Quantum Materials:
From Fundamental Insights to Novel Applications

Abstract:

Quantum materials provide an exciting platform to understand emergent phenomena in condensed matter systems. Our ability to synthesize these materials with atomic precision opens up new possibilities of engineering novel functionalities, and allows us to exploit them in devices for potential applications. Furthermore, by combining synthesis with advanced spectroscopy techniques we are able to gain insights into material systems that have remained out of reach of traditional experimental approaches. In this talk, I will describe an application of such an approach using thin films of an inter-metallic mixed-valence compound, ytterbium trialuminide (YbAl3). I will establish a precise one-to-one correspondence between the change in ytterbium (Yb) valence and a topological transition of the Fermi surface, which is accompanied by an enhancement of the Yb 4f density of states (DOS) at the Fermi level. I will further show how interactions in this system can be modified by fabricating ultra-thin films and superlattices, where YbAl3 atomic layers are separated by lutetium trialuminide (LuAl3) layers. Finally, by fabricating bi-layer heterostructures consisting of atomic layers of YbAl3 and a ferromagnet (iron), I will show that the spin hall conductivity in YbAl3 undergoes a dramatic enhancement at low temperatures. This enhancement follows the same temperature scaling as that of the Yb 4f DOS, thereby revealing the connection between heavy fermion formation and the observation of giant spin hall conductivity in this compound. I will conclude by showing applications of a similar approach in two other inter-metallic systems viz. Heusler compounds and rare-earth monopnictides and outlining future directions.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Speaker:Dr. Ian M. Lewis
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
Date:Thursday, February 21, 2019
Time:1:30 PM
Place:PS 147, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 365, OU
& Online Access
Title:Double Gauge Boson Production in the SM EFT

Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Ian M. Lewis
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
Date:Thursday, February 21, 2019
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:The Higgs Boson and New Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

Abstract:

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) presents us with an opportunity to explore the fundamental theory of nature at the highest energies to date.  The first run of the LHC was very successful, culminating in the discovery of a Higgs boson.  With the LHC run 2 data now being analyzed and future runs at higher energies, more discoveries are highly anticipated.  The discovery of the Higgs was a milestone in particle physics and measurements of its properties are long range priorities of the community.  In this talk, I will review the importance of the Higgs discovery and its relationship to additional new, beyond the Standard Model physics.  In particular, I will focus on how precise measurements of Higgs boson processes can shed light on the building blocks of our universe and what future measurements need yet to be performed to understand the generation of fundamental mass.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Journal Club on Statistical Mechanics, Condensed Matter Physics, and Optics (Informal):

Speaker:Dr. Elena Echeverria
Department of Physics
Oklahoma State University
Date:Friday, February 22, 2019
Time:1:30 PM
Place:PS 147
Title:Photoemission Spectroscopy Technique:
Basic Principles and Some Uses

Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, February 25-March 1, 2019


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Daniel A. Rhodes
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Columbia University, New York, NY
Date:Monday, February 25, 2019
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Disorder and Superconductivity in 2D TMD Heterostructures

Abstract:

Two dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) interest due to their novel optical and electronic properties, and their potential for application.  However, observations of the emergent phenomena in these materials is limited by scattering and nonradiative recombination processes due to a large density of defects and disorder at the interface.  In this work, using a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), we characterize the atomic and electronic nature of intrinsic point defects in single crystal TMDs.  We demonstrate that these defects can be reduced by almost three orders of magnitude (1013/cm2 to 5 × 1010/cm2) through a self-flux growth method.  This method of growth can be applied across a variety of TMDs and we further utilize this method to grow the superconducting TMD−MoTe2.  In the bulk, MoTe2 is a type II Weyl semimetal with a superconducting transition temperature (Tc) of 120 mK.  I will show that in the clean limit, the superconducting transition temperature is enhanced by a factor of 60× in monolayer Td-MoTe2, while still retaining a low carrier density (∼1013/cm2).  Reflecting the low carrier density, the critical temperature, magnetic field, and current density are all tunable by an applied gate voltage.  Furthermore, the temperature dependence of the in-plane upper critical field is distinct from that of 2H-TMDs, consistent with a complex spin texture predicted by ab initio theory.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Robert J. Lewis-Swan
Rey Theory Group, JILA
University of Colorado, Boulder, CO
Date:Thursday, February 28, 2019
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:A Tale of Oscillators and Spins:
A new paradigm for engineering many-body quantum states

Abstract:

The broad range of experimental platforms within the realm of atomic, molecular and optical (AMO) physics are widely being pursued as the underlying building blocks for future quantum technologies: From quantum simulators that may explain the behavior of strongly correlated material systems, to forming the basis of today’s most precise sensors. Progress in this direction has been predominantly fueled by the exquisite level of single-particle control and detection available in AMO systems. A key future challenge is to expand this single-particle control for the purposes of creating tailored many-body systems, in particular by engineering controllable coherent interactions to generate useful many-body entanglement.

In this colloquium I will discuss two apparently distinct but closely related systems currently being investigated in Boulder pursuant to this research direction: non-local atomic interactions mediated by photons [Science 361, 259 (2018)], and a spin-boson interaction realized by coupling the internal states of an ensemble of trapped ions forming a 2D crystal and their associated phonon modes [PRL 121, 040503 (2018)]. I will present our results in benchmarking the engineered Hamiltonians in both of these contexts, before discussing proposals to use these systems for quantum sensing, simulation and the study of dynamics of quantum information.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, March 4-8, 2019


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Derek Meyers
Department of Material Science and Engineering
University of California at Berkeley
Date:Thursday, March 7, 2019
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Forging Next Generation Materials Through Atomic Layer Engineering

Abstract:

Throughout history, technological and scientific advancements have been driven by mankind’s ability to craft the world around us into functional technologies. In this talk, we will explore a modern realization of this rich tradition involving the creation of artificial crystalline structures of complex oxides with unprecedented properties that promise next generation functionalities. Pulsed laser deposition allows stacking of single atomic layers of disparate materials with sharp interfaces and high crystalline quality. To directly probe these nanoscale interfaces, advanced synchrotron X-ray characterization will be introduced as a powerful tool for investigating the strongly entangled lattice, orbital, charge, and magnetic degrees of freedom exhibited by these artificial structures. Some of the fascinating physical phenomena derived from strongly correlated electrons, such as unconventional superconductivity and 2D magnetism, will be showcased as paragons of this growth and characterization methodology. In particular, the role of electron-phonon coupling in the recent SrTiO3-based superconductors and the magnetic behavior of isolated strongly spin-orbit coupled SrIrO3 layers will be discussed. We will conclude this talk with a discussion of the promising future applications for this class of materials, with an emphasis on topological phenomena and quantum information science.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, March 11-15, 2019


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Mayukh Lahiri
Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information (IQOQI)
of the Austrian Academy of Sciences
& Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Austria
Date:Monday, March 11, 2019
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Quantum Imaging and Two-Photon Correlation Measurement with Undetected Photons

Abstract:

A recent application of the principle of complementarity has led to a unique imaging technique in which the photon interacting with an object is not detected to construct the image [1,2]. We will discuss the associated theory and then show how it leads to a new research direction in the field of quantum information science, where the measurement of correlation between two or more particles is of crucial importance. As an example, we will present a novel method of measuring the correlation between the momenta of two photons. In our method, only one of the two photons is detected [3,4]. This enables us to take wavelengths into account for which good detectors are not available. Finally, the relevance of the method in producing entangled states will be mentioned in brief.

  1. GB Lemos, et al., Nature 512, 409 (2014).
  2. M Lahiri, R Lapkiewicz, GB Lemos and A Zeilinger, Phys. Rev. A 92, 013832 (2015).
  3. M Lahiri, A Hochrainer, R Lapkiewicz, GB Lemos and A Zeilinger, Phys. Rev. A 96, 013822 (2017).
  4. A Hochrainer, M Lahiri, R Lapkiewicz, GB Lemos and A Zeilinger, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. (USA) 114, 1508 (2017).

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Andrew J. Yost
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Center for Antiferromagnetic Memory and Logic
University of Nebraska–Lincoln
Date:Thursday, March 14, 2019
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:What Is the Local Density of States and Why Does It Matter?

Abstract:

For decades, physicists and engineers have been trying to fabricate better solar cells, optical sensors and memory and logic devices through “by design” schemes. The question is how to generalize this type of procedure to design better materials for better devices? How can we design better photovoltaics and optically active devices from the fundamental studies? The key lies in a better understanding of electronic structure—the quantum states of the material, both those that are occupied and the pertinent states that are not occupied. Indeed, for solar cell and optical sensor materials, understanding of the electron density of states is essential, especially across interfaces, because optical transitions are a quantum transition between states. Photoemission and inverse photoemission provide the experimentalist insights to the density of states, both occupied states and unoccupied states, respectively, over a large area. More importantly, scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy is a complementary technique which permits the experimentalist access to the local density of states at the atomic level and allows for the observation of local fluctuations in the density of states. From observations of changes in the electron density of states across an interface, we can determine the chemical identity of nano domains, as will be discussed in this talk with examples taken from emerging nanomaterials that are suitable for solar cells and optical sensors. This talk will also explore how the electron density of states of dopants allows physicists to develop an idea of a dopant’s relative position within a material. We will further discuss how the electron density of states can be used to observe differences in electron behavior at a surface versus electrons in the bulk. In this colloquium, we will look at the density of states in several systems, ranging from quantum dots to halide perovskite thin films to 2-D trichalcogenide nanowhiskers, and discuss why it matters in the design of better solar cell and optical sensor materials. These results are pertinent to the question of whether topologically protected photocurrents can be created—I will show that with careful design, I can create a photocurrent that preferentially wants to go one way down a quasi-one dimensional phototransistor.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, March 18-22, 2019


Spring Break & APS March Meeting


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, March 25-29, 2019


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Sayan Chandra
NanoScience and Technology Center
Department of Physics & College of Optics and Photonics (CREOL)
University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL
Date:Monday, March 25, 2019
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Multifunctional Materials for Optoelectronics: From Concept to Device

Abstract:

Discovery of novel materials along with advancements in nanofabrication techniques has allowed researchers to uncover exciting phenomena that hold promise for the development of next generation electro-optic devices. Investigating the fundamental electronic, thermal and magnetic properties of emerging materials is critical to the realization of such devices that require innovative material processing, nanofabrication and optical engineering. Furthermore, identifying avenues to achieve dynamically tunable response is paramount for future electronic applications in the visible to mid-wave infrared (MIR) to the long wave infrared (LWIR) domain.

In my talk, I will discuss how to manipulate light-matter interaction in (i) strongly correlated electron systems (VO2) and (ii) 2D materials like graphene. We take advantage of the metal-insulator phase transition in VO2 to generate infrared color in the MIR and LWIR regime. The phase transition induces a dynamic response within a quasi-3D plasmonic crystal coupled to an optical cavity thereby enabling multispectral infrared camouflage [1]. In another system, we show that by coupling a monolayer nanopatterned graphene to an optical cavity and by electrostatically tuning the Fermi level, infrared absorption can be enhanced up to 90% which is remarkably higher than pristine graphene that absorbs about 3% light in LWIR [2]. Using this enhanced absorption, we show the design and development of a novel room temperature plasmon assisted photo-thermoelectric long wave infrared (LWIR) detection scheme in graphene. The results outline a strategy that, in principle, can be extended to other 2D materials for uncooled, tunable, multispectral infrared detection [3]. Finally, I will provide a brief outlook on hybrid composite systems engineered to achieve tunable optical response for desired applications.

  1. Chandra et al., ‘Adaptive Multispectral Infrared Camouflage’, ACS Photonics 5, 4513 (2018)
  2. Chandra et al., ‘Wide Angle Dynamically Tunable Enhanced Infrared Absorption on Large Area Nanopatterned Graphene’, ACS Nano, 13, 421 (2019)
  3. Chandra et al., ‘Dirac Plasmon Assisted Asymmetric Hot Carrier Generation for Room-Temperature Infrared Detection’, (submitted to Nat Nanotechnology)

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Ahmed Ismail
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
Date:Thursday, March 28, 2019
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:TBA

Abstract:

TBA

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, April 1-5, 2019


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Yue Zhang
Theoretical Physics Department
Fermilab, Batavia, IL
& Department of Physics and Astronomy
Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
Date:Monday, April 1, 2019
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:TBA

Abstract:

TBA

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Speaker:Dr. Rouzbeh Allahverdi
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of New Mexico
Date:Thursday, April 4, 2019
Time:1:30 PM
Place:PS 147, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 365, OU
& Online Access
Title:TBA

Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Zhen Liu
Maryland Center for Fundamental Physics
Department of Physics
University of Maryland, College Park, MD
Date:Thursday, April 4, 2019
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:TBA

Abstract:

TBA

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, April 8-12, 2019


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Dorival Gonçalves-Netto
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
Date:Monday, April 8, 2019
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:TBA

Abstract:

TBA

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Speaker:Dr. Carlos E.M. Wagner
Department of Physics, Enrico Fermi Institute, and Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics
University of Chicago, Chicago, IL
& Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL
Date:Thursday, April 11, 2019
Time:1:30 PM
Place:PS 147, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 365, OU
& Online Access
Title:TBA

Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, April 15-19, 2019


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Speaker:Dr. Bhaskar Dutta
George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Texas A&M University, College Station, TX
Date:Thursday, April 18, 2019
Time:1:30 PM
Place:PS 147, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 365, OU
& Online Access
Title:TBA

Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, April 22-26, 2019



Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, April 29-May 3, 2019


Prefinals Week

No talks scheduled.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, May 6-10, 2019


Finals Week

No talks scheduled.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, May 13-17, 2019



Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, May 20-24, 2019


No talks scheduled.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, May 27-31, 2019



Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, June 3-7, 2019


No talks scheduled.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, June 10-14, 2019


No talks scheduled.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, June 17-21, 2019


No talks scheduled.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, June 24-28, 2019


No talks scheduled.


Last Updated: February 1, 2019.

This page was prepared by Helen Au-Yang and Jacques H.H. Perk.

jhhp@jperk.phy.okstate.edu