Seminars and Colloquia, July through December, 2017


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Seminars and Colloquia, Typical Week:


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Date:Thursday
Time:1:30-3:00 PM
Place:106A Studio Room, Classroom Building, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 365, OU
& Online Access
Inquiries: joseph.haley@okstate.edu or kao@nhn.ou.edu

Physics Colloquium:

Date:Thursday
Time:3:30-4:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Inquiries: joseph.haley@okstate.edu or mario.borunda@okstate.edu

Journal Club on Statistical Mechanics and Condensed Matter Physics (Informal):

Date:Friday (bi)weekly
Time:2:30 PM
Place:PS 147
Inquiries: perk@okstate.edu or mario.borunda@okstate.edu

Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, July 3-7, 2017


No talks scheduled


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, July 10-14, 2017


No talks scheduled


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, July 17-21, 2017


No talks scheduled


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, July 24-28, 2017


No talks scheduled


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, July 31-August 4, 2017


No talks scheduled


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, August 7-11, 2017


No talks scheduled


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, August 14-18, 2017


No talks scheduled


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, August 21-25, 2017


First Week of Classes

No talks scheduled


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, August 28-September 1, 2017


Second Week of Classes


Physics Colloquium:

Rescheduled to September 14 to avoid parking problems caused by football.


Journal Club on Statistical Mechanics, Condensed Matter Physics, and Optics (Informal):

Speaker:Mr. Shuo Dai
Department of Physics
Oklahoma State University
Date:Friday, September 1, 2017
Time:1:30 PM
Place:PS 147
Title:Benchmarking DFT/TD-DFT Functionals for Frontier Orbital Energies Predictions on Organic Photovoltaic Molecules

Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, September 4-8, 2017


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Speaker:Dr. Bhupal Dev
Department of Physics
Washington University, St. Louis, MO
Date:Thursday, September 7, 2017
Time:1:30 PM
Place:106A Studio Room, Classroom Building, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 365, OU
& Online Access
Title:Flavorful Leptogenesis and Collider Signals

Abstract:

Low-scale leptogenesis provides a unique opportunity to test the connection between two beyond the Standard Model phenomena, namely, neutrino mass and baryon asymmetry of the universe. We will elucidate this connection in the context of TeV-scale seesaw models with discrete flavor symmetries, in which case, the Dirac Yukawa couplings are completely dictated by the low-energy neutrino mixing parameters and the heavy neutrino masses. This scenario predicts distinctive correlated features in CP and lepton number/flavor violating observables, which could be used to probe this scenario at the high-energy frontier.


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Bhupal Dev
Department of Physics
Washington University, St. Louis, MO
Date:Thursday, September 7, 2017
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Neutrino as a Gateway to New Physics

Abstract:

Neutrinos have played a crucial role in our understanding of the Universe. In particular, the discovery of neutrino oscillations has provided a concrete evidence for the existence of some new physics beyond the Standard Model. However, given the lack of information on the exact nature of the underlying new physics, it is crucial to take a broader, coherent approach by exploring possible connections with other empirically-supported clues. To this end, we will discuss a synergistic study using the neutrino portal at three interrelated frontiers of fundamental physics. The complementarity between various high and low-energy observables makes this study extremely useful, irrespective of the final outcome of the ongoing direct searches for new physics at the Large Hadron Collider.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


OSU Computational Modeling & Theory Supergroup Meeting:

Organized jointly by research groups in Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Mechanical Engineering and Physics

Speaker:Mr. Prashanth Chandran
School of Chemical Engineering
Date:Friday, September 8, 2017
Time:4:00 PM
Place:Engineering South 412
Title:Computation of Liquid-Liquid Equilibrium from Molecular Simulations:
Application to the Discovery of Desalination Solvents

Speaker:Mr. Kyle Stoltz
Department of Physics
Date:Friday, September 8, 2017
Time:4:30 PM
Place:Engineering South 412
Title:Band Structures of Organic Polymers

Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, September 11-15, 2017


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Kenneth D. Clinkenbeard
Graduate College &
Department of Veterinary Pathobiology
Oklahoma State University
Date:Thursday, September 14, 2017
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Three Minute Thesis and Three Minute Presentations Competitions

Abstract:

The three minute competitions help non-thesis masters and graduate certificate students (3MP) and thesis master’s and doctoral students (3MT) learn to present what they do as graduate students and how this is relevant to meeting societal needs in a concise, understandable and engaging manner. For the first time, both the 3MP and 3MT competitions will be offered in the fall semester. Cash prizes can be won by your students at the preliminary or college level ($100–$300) and for the OSU Finals ($500–$1,000).

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, September 18-22, 2017


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Speaker:Dr. Bhaskar Dutta
Interim Director and Professor
George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy
& 2017 OSU Physics Distinguished Alumnus
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Texas A&M University, College Station, TX
Date:Friday, September 22, 2017
Time:1:30 PM
Place:Chemistry Conference room, PS 116, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 365, OU
& Online Access
Title:Z' Models for B-Anomalies at the LHC

Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Bhaskar Dutta
Interim Director and Professor
George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Texas A&M University, College Station, TX
Date:Friday, September 22, 2017
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Particle Theory Models and Dark Matter: A Status Update

Abstract:

The recent results from the ongoing Large Hadron Collider, various direct and indirect dark matter detection experiments and data from PLANCK satellite observations have introduced considerable constraints on the particle physics model ideas related to dark matter.  This talk will address the current status of particle physics models and their predictions for the upcoming experiments.

Note: Dr. Dutta is also honored as Distinguished Alumnus by the College of Arts and Sciences.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, September 25-29, 2017


PhD Dissertation Defense:

Speaker:Mr. Shuo Dai
Department of Physics
Oklahoma State University
Date:Monday, September 25, 2017
Time:9:00 AM
Place:PS 147
Title:Density Functional Theory and Time-Dependent-DFT Modeling of Organic Photovoltaic Materials

Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Raman P. Singh
Associate Dean for Engineering at OSU-Tulsa
Helmerich Family Endowed Chair Professor of Engineering
Professor & Head, School of Material Science and Engineering
Professor, School of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering
Director, Helmerich Research Center, Tulsa
Date:Thursday, September 28, 2017
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Quantifying UV Degradation at the Carbon Fiber-Matrix Interphase using AFM Indentation

Abstract:

This talk presents recent results on studies conducted to investigate the effects of ultraviolet (UV) exposure of composite materials.  Ultraviolet radiation causes photocatalytic degradation in polymers leading to material degradation.  While numerous studies have been done to characterize the effects of UV exposure on the macro-scale properties of bulk polymers and composite materials, the effects of UV degradation on the interphase and in near-fiber regions are not clearly understood.

In this work we implement AFM indentation based force-mapping to investigate the effect of UV exposure on the interphase region of carbon fiber composites.  Samples exposed to ultraviolet (UV) chamber for 24 hours at 0.68 W/m2/nm irradiance at 340 nm and 60oC.  Force mapping was used to generate “full-field” load-displacement indentation curves, which were then analyzed using the Oliver–Pharr model to determine elastic modulus.  In this manner it was possible to create 32×32 and 64×64 arrays of elastic modulus values in the interphase region and the near-fiber region.  For neat CFRP sample and interphase region of thickness 100–200 μm was observed.  While for UV exposed samples a distinct interphase region was not observed.  This is attributed to the increase in chemical cross-linking of the epoxy resin due to UV exposure around the carbon fiber.  The presentation concludes with an overview of research activities and capabilities at the Helmerich Research Center and discusses areas of possible collaboration.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


OSU Computational Modeling & Theory Supergroup Meeting:

Speaker:Dr. Cassie S. Mitchell
Assistant Professor, Biomedical Engineering
Principal Investigator, Laboratory for Pathology Dynamics
Georgia Institute of Technology & Emory University School of Medicine
Date:Friday, September 29, 2017
Time:4:00 PM
Place:Engineering South 412
Title:After the Ice Bucket: Thawing Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis with Predictive Medicine

Abstract:

The prolific 2014 ALS Association’s Ice Bucket Challenge commenced the world-wide dumping of ice water on the heads of courageous supporters to bring awareness and research funding to a lesser-known yet fatal neurodegenerative disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS).  The Laboratory for Pathology Dynamics at Georgia Tech, which proudly dunked GT President Peterson during the GT ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, has been actively developing data analytics, informatics, and complex systems-based techniques to expedite preclinical and clinical ALS research.  In short, we are vigorously stitching together a comprehensive quilt of ALS using thousands of data sets collected from cells, transgenic animal models, and patients.  We will discuss how predictive medicine is revealing ALS etiological underpinnings and diagnostic markers; identifying epidemiological ALS patient commonalities; precisely forecasting survival in highly heterogeneous ALS populations; identifying future disease dynamics-based combination therapies in preclinical ALS animal models; and optimizing current ALS life-prolonging interventions.  Finally, we will also discuss the application of the lab’s techniques to other research topics.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, October 2-6, 2017


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Salahuddin Ahmad
Department of Radiation Oncology and
Department of Radiological Sciences
University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center (OUHSC)
Date:Thursday, October 5, 2017
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:PS 110
Title:Clinical and Research Profile of the Department of Radiation Oncology

Abstract:

At the outset, the clinical, educational and research programs of the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Oklahoma HSC will be discussed. Two topics one on “Treatment Plan Evaluation and Optimization Based on Radiobiologic Parameters” and the other on “Advances in Proton and Heavy Ion Treatment” will then be presented.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Journal Club on Statistical Mechanics, Condensed Matter Physics, and Optics (Informal):

Speaker:Dr. Jacques H.H. Perk
Department of Physics
Oklahoma State University
Date:Friday, October 6, 2017
Time:1:30 PM
Place:PS 147
Title:Clifford Algebra (Majorana Fermion) Approach to Quantum Spin Chains and 2-Dimensional Ising Models

Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, October 9-13, 2017


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Vibhudutta Awasthi
Sandra K and David L Gilliland Chair in Nuclear Pharmacy
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy
University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center (OUHSC)
Date:Thursday, October 12, 2017
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Research Imaging Facility in OUHSC for Drug and Formulation Development

Abstract:

According to the Critical Path Initiative of FDA and NCI, development of imaging biomarkers is vital in addressing the expedited and cost-effective development of new drugs. The Research Imaging Facility (RIF) is the first public facility in Oklahoma to provide molecular imaging capability for research. At present, the RIF provides positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission tomography (SPECT), and X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging services. In addition, a dedicated low energy cyclotron is available to produce positron-emitting radionuclides for synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals. These equipment are leveraged by biomedical researchers in OUHSC as well as investigators in Oklahoma to hasten pre-clinical phase in the development of therapeutic or diagnostic agents.

With an overall objective of engendering cross-institution collaboration, the presenter(s) of this seminar will introduce the audience to nuclear imaging in general and our service capabilities in particular. In one instance, we have applied molecular imaging to answer critical developmental questions about artificial oxygen carriers. We use PET and SPECT to demonstrate that nano-particulate liposome-encapsulated hemoglobin (LEH) circulates in the body for a prolonged duration, carries oxygen in blood, and delivers oxygen to the brain for improved cerebral metabolism. Further applications of nuclear imaging and radiochemistry in drug development will be shared.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, October 16-20, 2017


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Kyle A. Copeland
Federal Aviation Administration, Civil Aerospace Medical Institute
Oklahoma City
Date:Thursday, October 19, 2017
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Health Physics in Aerospace Environments

Abstract:

Ionizing radiation exposure is a known source of health risks. Besides the shipment of radioactive materials, there are other natural sources of ionizing radiation that must be considered such as solar and galactic cosmic radiation. Measurements of doses from these radiations are insufficient to build empirical models that meet current operational needs, and massive deployment of good quality instruments on aircraft is considered impractical. In addition to dosimetry issues, modeling the cosmic radiation environment in the atmosphere is a complex problem. While predominantly protons, cosmic ray primaries of other elements occur at fluences that cannot be neglected if calculations are to be reasonably accurate. Over the past three decades the FAA’s Radiobiology Research Team has used the deterministic radiation transport software LUIN and more recently the Monte Carlo radiation transport software MCNPX to build software (called CARI) to calculate flight doses and evaluate solar proton events. The two approaches are compared in terms of limitations and advantages.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Students’ Fall Break: Friday, October 20


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, October 23-27, 2017


OSU Department of Mathematics Special Lecture:

Speaker:Dr. Elisabetta A. Matsumoto
School of Physics
Georgia Institute of Technology
Date:Friday, October 27, 2017
Time:3:30 – 4:30 PM
Place:Student Union, Rm. 416
Title:Non-Euclidean Virtual Reality

Abstract:

The properties of euclidean space seem natural and obvious to us, to the point that it took mathematicians over two thousand years to see an alternative to Euclid’s parallel postulate. The eventual discovery of hyperbolic geometry in the 19th century shook our assumptions, revealing just how strongly our native experience of the world blinded us from consistent alternatives, even in a field that many see as purely theoretical. Non-euclidean spaces are still seen as unintuitive and exotic, but with direct immersive experiences we can get a better Intuitive feel for them. The latest wave of virtual reality hardware, in particular the HTC Vive, tracks both the orientation and the position of the headset within a room-sized volume, allowing for such an experience. We use this nascent technology to explore the three-dimensional geometries of the Thurston/Perelman geometrization theorem. This talk focuses on our simulations of H3 and H2×E.


OSU Computational Modeling & Theory Supergroup Meeting:

Organized jointly by research groups in Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Mechanical Engineering and Physics

Speaker:Mr. Utkarsh Kapoor
School of Chemical Engineering
Date:Friday, October 27, 2017
Time:4:00 PM
Place:Engineering South 412
Title:TBA

Speaker:Mr. Atiya Banerjee
School of Chemical Engineering
Date:Friday, October 27, 2017
Time:4:30 PM
Place:Engineering South 412
Title:TBA

Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, October 30-November 3, 2017


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Speaker:Dr. Alexander Khanov
Department of Physics
Oklahoma State University
Date:Thursday, November 2, 2017
Time:1:30 PM
Place:106A Studio Room, Classroom Building, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 365, OU
& Online Access
Title:Physics with the ATLAS Detector at the HL-LHC

Abstract:

The High luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) project is a proposed upgrade to the LHC by year 2025. I will present and discuss the prospects for physics studies at the HL-LHC with a data set equivalent to 3000 fb-1, simulated in the upgrade ATLAS detector.


OSU Computational Modeling & Theory Supergroup Meeting:

Organized jointly by research groups in Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Mechanical Engineering and Physics

Speaker:Ms. Minu Pilvankar
School of Chemical Engineering
Date:Friday, November 3, 2017
Time:4:00 PM
Place:Engineering South 412
Title:A PK/PD Model of ACE Inhibition of Glucose-Stimulated Renin-Angiotensin System in Kidney Cells for Normal and Diabetic Cases

Speaker:Mr. Gentry Smith
Department of Chemistry
Date:Friday, November 3, 2017
Time:4:30 PM
Place:Engineering South 412
Title:Small-Scale Folding

Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, November 6-10, 2017


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. William J. Gannon
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Texas A&M University, College Station, TX
Date:Monday, November 6, 2017
Time:4:00 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Exploring Quantum Magnetic Fluctuations in Low Dimensional Correlated Electron Systems

Abstract:

Quantum magnetic fluctuations are one of the key concepts in modern condensed matter physics, and is a thread that ties together a vast array of topics, from the coherence of unconventional superconductivity to the entangled disorder of quantum spin liquids to name just two examples.  In this talk, I will discuss why it is essential to understand quantum magnetic fluctuations in materials that host them and how we can use inelastic neutron scattering to probe these important phenomena.  As a specific example, I will discuss how quantum magnetism is manifest in the correlated electron metal Yb2Pt2Pb and the observation of fractionalized one dimensional spin excitations, quasiparticle confinement, and longitudinally polarized quantum modes.  Finally, I will discuss how these measurements can point to new and interesting research directions.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:30 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Chunhui Du
Department of Physics
Harvard University
Date:Thursday, November 9, 2017
Time:4:00 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Control and Local Measurement of the Spin Chemical Potential in a Magnetic Insulator

Abstract:

In recent decades, a large scientific effort has focused on harnessing spin transport for providing insights into novel materials and low-dissipation information processing. We introduce single spin magnetometry based on nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond as a new and generic platform to locally probe spin chemical potentials which essentially determine the flow of spin currents. We use this platform to investigate magnons in a magnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet (YIG) on a 100 nanometer length scale. We demonstrate that the local magnon chemical potential can be systematically controlled through both ferromagnetic resonance and electrical spin excitation, which agrees well with the theoretical analysis of the underlying multi-magnon processes. Our results open up new possibilities for nanoscale imaging and manipulation of spin-related phenomena in condensed-matter systems.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:30 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, November 13-17, 2017


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Speaker:Mr. Digesh Raut
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Alabama
Date:Monday, November 13, 2017
Time:1:00 PM
Place:PS 116/117, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 365, OU
& Online Access
Title:Inflation, Dark Matter, and LHC Phenomenology in Minimal Gauged U(1)X Extension of SM

Abstract:

In the context of gauged U(1) extension of SM, we discuss the cosmological inflation scenarios, dark matter physics, and LHC phenomenology.  We consider minimal U(1)X extended SM, a generalization of the minimal U(1)B−L model which is realized as a linear combination of the SM U(1)Y and the U(1)B−L gauge symmetries.  In addition to a B−L scalar and a new Z′ gauge boson, the model also includes three generations of right handed neutrinos (RHNs) for the anomaly cancellation.  With an identification of the B−L scalar to be the inflaton field, we investigate inflection-point inflation which naturally accommodates inflation scenario with initial inflation scale below the Planck mass (φIMPl).  For a renormalization group improved effective λφ4 potential to develop an inflection-point with inflationary predictions consistent with the current cosmological observations, the mass ratios among the Z′ gauge boson, the RHNs, and the inflaton are fixed.  In the B−L limit with the gauge boson mass less than 1 TeV we find that the scenario can be tested in the future collider experiments such as the High-Luminosity LHC and the SHiP experiments.  On the other extreme, we consider the scenario such that the U(1)X gauge symmetry is mostly oriented towards the SM U(1)Y direction and investigate a consistency between the inflationary predictions and the latest LHC Run-2 results on narrow resonance Z′ search with a di-lepton final state.  Dark matter (DM) physics is another interesting possibility that we consider.  Implementing Z2 parity to one of the RHNs, we investigate the possibility of “Z′-portal” DM scenario to explore the viable parameter region consistent with the relic abundance and state.  Finally, we consider the prospect of RHN discovery at the LHC via Z′ boson decay.  U(1)X model provides significant enhancement of the production cross section of the RHNs from Z′ decay in the future LHC experiments, which is crucial for the discovery of RHNs given that the production cross-section of Z′ boson via di-lepton resonance is severely constrained.  Taking this into account, we conclude that the possibility of discovering the RHNs in the future implies that the Z′ boson will soon be discovered at the LHC.


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Brian B. Zhou
Institute for Molecular Engineering
University of Chicago
Date:Monday, November 13, 2017
Time:4:00 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Shaping the Quantum Dynamics of Single Spins in Diamond

Abstract:

Remarkable progress in the control of atomic-scale systems have confirmed the quantum foundation of our world, as well as inspired new paradigms for technological innovation. For its long spin coherence and optical interface, the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center—an atomic defect in diamond—presents a premier platform for secure quantum communication and high-precision sensing. The common enabler of these applications is the ability to coherently manipulate quantum states with high speed and high fidelity. We demonstrate novel dynamical methods using resonant and near-resonant optical fields to control single NV spins with high spatial resolution and low power. To hybridize robustness with speed by overcoming conventional adiabatic speed limits, we engineer ‘superadiabatic’ dynamics to create and transfer arbitrary coherent states [1]. We then extend geometric quantum control to high-speed quantum gates by using non-adiabatic matrix holonomies [2]. These techniques are widely translatable and simplify the implementation of all-optical quantum networks.

  1. B. B. Zhou et al., Nature Physics 13, 330 (2017).
  2. B. B. Zhou et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 119, 140503 (2017).

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:30 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Speaker:Dr. Benjamin Kreis
LHC Physics Center (LPC)
Fermilab
Date:Thursday, November 16, 2017
Time:1:30 PM
Place:106A Studio Room, Classroom Building, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 365, OU
& Online Access
Title:Migrating Advanced Analysis Techniques to Fast Hardware for the CMS Phase 2 Trigger

Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Peter. A. Dowben
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Nebraska–Lincoln
Date:Thursday, November 16, 2017
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Electrically Controlled Surface Magnetism and Energy Savings in Solid State Electronics

Abstract:

The problems faced by the increasing power density and decreasing device size in semiconductor technologies will be reviewed and an effort is made to motivate why spintronics may lead to energy savings in solid state electronics. The inherent non-volatility of long-range ordered magnetism adds functionality over today’s random access memory (RAM) elements. The latter require refresh power during operation and the information is lost when power is lost, not true of the nonvolatile magneto-electric device. Manipulation of magnetically ordered states by electrical means (the magneto-electric effect) is among the most promising approaches towards novel spintronic devices [1–4]. Indeed, voltage control of magnetism is a grand challenge of spintronics. The reasons that magnetoelectric devices lead to energy savings are simple enough: voltage control of a nonvolatile magnetic state virtually eliminates the need for large current densities, the accompanying power consumption, and detrimental Joule heating on writing and potentially also on reading. In this talk, the magneto-electron phenomena is reviewed. Exchange bias is reviewed. The interplay between band structure and boundary polarization has considerable significance in devices that rely on the magneto-electric phenomena and this too is reviewed. The context for this discussion is that one can then utilize the electrically switchable and nonvolatile boundary magnetization of magneto-electric antiferromagnets, such as chromia, to generate a voltage-controlled exchange field, which determines the carrier spin in the conducting channel or can be used to reverse magnetization or an adjacent ferromagnet. Such devices can actually “beat” silicon technologies in terms of energy cost.

  1. Ch. Binek, B. Doudin, J. Phys. Condens. Matter 17, L39 (2005).
  2. P.A. Dowben, C. Binek, and D.E. Nikonov, “Potential of nonvolatile magnetoelectric devices for spintronic applications”, Chapter 11 in Nanoscale Silicon Devices; edited by Shuni Oda and David Ferry; Taylor and Francis (London) (2016) pp 255–278, ISBN 9781482228670.
  3. Xi He, Yi Wang, N. Wu, A.N. Caruso, E. Vescovo, K.D. Belashchenko, P.A. Dowben and C. Binek, Nature Materials 9 (2010) 579–585.
  4. N. Wu, Xi He, A. Wysocki, U. Lanke, T. Komesu, K.D. Belashchenko, C. Binek and P.A. Dowben, Physical Review Letters 106 (2011) 087202.
  5. Shi Cao, X. Zhang, N. Wu, A. T. N’Diaye, G. Chen, A. K. Schmid, X. Chen, W. Echtenkamp, A. Enders, Ch. Binek, P. A. Dowben, New Journal of Physics 16 (2014) 073021.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Special Condensed Matter Seminar:

Speaker:Dr. Peter. A. Dowben
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Nebraska–Lincoln
Date:Friday, November 17, 2017
Time:9:30 AM
Place:PS 147
Title:The History and Development of Boron Carbon Alloy Devices and Rare Earth Heterojunction Neutron Detectors

Abstract:

Traditional neutron detectors have been large, delicate, cumbersome and expensive, with high power requirements.  A SOLID STATE neutron detector would overcome many of these problems.  We believe that there are neutron detector technologies, developed at the University of Nebraska and elsewhere, that can be substantially improved, possibly outclassing all other competing technologies for the monitoring and detecting of fissile and other neutron emitting radioactive materials in terms of expense of manufacture, device lifetime and power consumption.  These technologies are based on the development of novel semiconductor materials, based on boron.  These boron based materials have been used to measure the energy and flux of the steady state solar neutron flux from the sun.  Note: solid state physicists can become astronomers.


OSU Computational Modeling & Theory Supergroup Meeting:

Organized jointly by research groups in Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Mechanical Engineering and Physics

Speaker:Mr. Sherin Shanaka Paranahewage
Department of Chemistry
Date:Friday, November 17, 2017
Time:4:00 PM
Place:Engineering South 412
Title:TBA

Speaker:Mr. Casey Williamson
Department of Chemistry
Date:Friday, November 17, 2017
Time:4:30 PM
Place:Engineering South 412
Title:TBA

Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, November 20-24, 2017


Thanksgiving


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, November 27-December 1, 2017



Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, December 4-8, 2017


Prefinals Week


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Emrah Turgut
School of Applied and Engineering Physics
Cornell University
Date:Monday, December 4, 2017
Time:4:00 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Spin Dynamics of Topological Spin Textures in Chiral Magnets

Abstract:

The chiral spin textures are a consequence of the anti-symmetric exchange interaction, which presents in the material systems with broken inversion symmetry, such as B20 FeGe. This interaction enables chiral magnetic order, including topologically non-trivial magnetic skyrmions, which display rich new magnetic phenomena and require low critical current densities to manipulate. This makes magnetic skyrmions a promising platform for power-efficient spintronics applications. Therefore, a deeper understanding of the static and dynamic magnetic properties of these materials will be a key step toward their application in spintronic devices. In this talk, I will present our study of both sputtered, epitaxial B20 FeGe and B20 FeGe grown using vapor transport. In particular, I will discuss microwave absorption spectroscopy (MAS) of bulk, single crystal FeGe with which we identify the spin dynamics of all magnetic phases. These results reveal the critical role of substrate-induced strain on the magnetic phases of B20 FeGe. To gain better control over strain and to tune the strength of anti-symmetric exchange, I grew B20 FeGe and MnxFe1−xGe on Si with MBE. After characterization using electron and X-ray diffraction, magnetometry, and cryo-Lorentz-STEM imaging, we study MAS of these films. We identify a new spin wave mode along the film thickness, with a wavelength that matches its helical period, enabling a new, simple method of quantitatively characterizing the anti-symmetric exchange.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:30 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, December 11-15, 2017


Finals Week

No talks scheduled


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, December 18-22, 2017


No talks scheduled


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, December 25-29, 2017


No talks scheduled.


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This page was prepared by Helen Au-Yang and Jacques H.H. Perk.
jhhp@jperk.phy.okstate.edu