Seminars and Colloquia, January through June, 2015


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Seminars and Colloquia, Typical Week:


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Date:Thursday
Time:1:30-3:00 PM
Place:106 B Studio Room, Classroom Building, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 103, OU
Inquiries: babu@okstate.edu or kao@nhn.ou.edu

Physics Colloquium:

Date:Thursday
Time:3:30-4:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Inquiries: perk@okstate.edu or s.nandi@okstate.edu

Journal Club on Statistical Mechanics and Condensed Matter Physics, and Optics (Informal):

Date:Friday (bi)weekly
Time:2:00 PM
Place:PS 147
Inquiries: perk@okstate.edu or girish.agarwal@okstate.edu

Oklahoma Nanonet Informal Seminar:

Date:Friday (bi)weekly
Time:2:30 PM
Place:PS 355
Inquiries: wtford@okstate.edu

Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, January 1-2, 2015


No talks scheduled


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, January 5-9, 2015


No talks scheduled


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, January 12-16, 2015


First Week of Classes


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, January 19-23, 2015


Martin Luther King Day, Monday, January 19, 2014

Second Week of Classes


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, January 26-30, 2015


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Bruce J. Ackerson
Department of Physics
Oklahoma State University
Date:Thursday, January 29, 2015
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Physics and Technology for Future Presidents

Abstract:

Lack of science literacy concerns all of us.  Our state senator, James Inhofe, claims global warming is a hoax.  Evolution is perennially disputed.  Students believe electricity simply comes from the wall plug, evidently by magic.  On the other hand, scientific content grows exponentially.  All become science illiterate to some degree.  So, who should address the science literacy problem? What does a science literate person need to know?

Richard Muller, a professor of physics at the University of California, accepted personal responsibility for the problem.  He developed a popular, non-mathematical, lowest level class, “Physics and Technology for Future Presidents.” He chooses physics content based on what the President of the United States needs to know.  What science is important politically?  What science is in the news?

Stephen Johnston, a physics and political science double major (2004), told me about Muller’s course.  Since Jim Harmon retired, I used Muller’s text for our Physics 1014 class last semester.  This talk will describe the students taking the class, the content presented, the homework, and the examinations.  I followed Muller’s class as closely as possible.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, February 2-6, 2015


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Gil Summy
Department of Physics
Oklahoma State University
Date:Thursday, February 5, 2015
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Optical Potentials for Atoms: From BEC to Quantum Chaos

Abstract:

The last ten years or so has seen the development of a wide range of techniques for manipulating the matter waves associated with atoms that have a temperature of just a few hundred nano-Kelvin. In this talk, I will describe some of the experiments that my group has conducted at OSU using optical potentials for these ultra-cold atoms. These range from studies of the production of Bose–Einstein condensates using an “all-optical” process, to the use of spatially periodic potentials formed with standing light waves for quantum chaos research. I will show that the latter system is not only an important tool for examining the transition between the quantum and classical realms, but can also provide new ways to manipulate atomic matter waves for metrological applications.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, February 9-13, 2015


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Subhash Kak
Regents Professor, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Oklahoma State University
Date:Thursday, February 12, 2015
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Whither Quantum Computing and Quantum Cryptography?

Abstract:

This talk will provide an overview of the popular topics of quantum computing and quantum cryptography. DOD, DOE, NASA, Amazon, Microsoft, Google are backing quantum computing, and IBM’s 3-billion research initiative includes quantum computing as a key technology. The UK recently invested nearly half a billion in an initiative in quantum technology. There already are companies in the quantum cryptography business although there are no quantum computing products. One company D-Wave claims to have a quantum computer but most researchers are not convinced that its computation is really quantum. Is QC going to change the world, or is it hype?

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, February 16-20, 2015


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Uwe Titt
Department of Radiation Physics—Patient Care, Division of Radiation Oncology
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX
Date:Monday, February 16, 2015
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Useful Physics…Clinical Research Using the Monte Carlo Method

Abstract:

Research and development of novel and improved radiation delivery devices and methods can be prohibitively resource intensive in a clinical environment, based on the fact that accelerators are costly, beam time is sparse and patient treatments have, of course, the highest priority. Hence, performing physical experiments with radiation delivery devices may not be the most practical way of solving research problems, considering that many problems may as well be solved using a simulation environment. The Monte Carlo method provides a simulation system based on random numbers and on interaction probabilities, and is an extremely elegant and useful tool to investigate scientific problems in a virtual universe. In this presentation we will discuss development work and research of photon therapy and proton therapy related problems, using the Monte Carlo method.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Speaker:Dr. Takeshi Fukuyama
Research Center for Nuclear Physics
Osaka University, Osaka, Japan
Date:Thursday, February 19, 2015
Time:1:30 PM
Place:106 B Studio Room, Classroom Building, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 103, OU
Title:Renormalizable Minimal SUSY SO(10) GUT

Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Regina DeWitt
Department of Physics
East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
Date:Thursday, February 19, 2015
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:OSL Dosimetry: Materials, Measurements, and More

Abstract:

Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) works on the principle that particle or photon radiation can ionize atoms within minerals. The freed electrons become trapped at light sensitive crystal defects and the number of trapped electrons increases over time. Exposure to light releases the trapped electrons and they recombine with charges of the opposite sign. The light emitted during this process is called OSL. The OSL signal is proportional to the radiation dose absorbed in the mineral and thus can be used for dosimetric purposes.

In my presentation I will explain the luminescence process and how it can be used for radiation dosimetry. I will describe an instrument for spatially resolved measurements which is suited to characterize non-uniform radiation fields. And I will describe applications of OSL ranging from environmental radiation in astrobiology, over accident dosimetry, to geologic dating.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


OU/OSU Condensed Matter Physics Seminar:

Speaker:Dr. Wiley P. Kirk
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
University of Texas at Arlington
Date:Friday, February 20, 2015
Time:9:30 AM
Place:PS 148 (and room 203 Nielsen Hall, OU)
Title:How can stress be both good and bad for quantum dots?

Abstract:

Quantum confinement in the form of zero-dimensional quantum dots (QDs) is an important scientific concept, allowing modification of quantum-mechanical properties such as energy level spacing, density of states, absorption coefficients, and so on in materials.[1]  In this context, QDs are thought of as tailor-made “artificial atoms” in condensed matter systems.  This ability has been actively pursued in recent years to improve the performance of various photonic and optoelectronic applications.  In the case of lasers, workers have demonstrated improved coherent photon emission from QD-based lasers when the QDs were used to modify properties such as energy level spacing and the density of states of the electron transitions.  In some circumstances, these improvements have led to useful commercial products.  However, the reverse case has been less effective, such as in solar cells where photons drive electron transitions between energy levels; and the anticipated improvements in device performance due to the QDs has not yet succeeded.[2]  In this talk, I discuss why the latter situation has arisen and then present results that explain how lattice strain management can be used to overcome some of these problems.  Specifically, the observations of lattice strain and stress behavior in QD heterostructures will be addressed, using tools such as high-resolution x-ray diffraction reciprocal space maps, atomic force microscopy, and photoluminescence to investigate and analyze strain mechanisms as found in p-i-n structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy using the Stranski-Krastanov growth method.[3]

  1. See early papers in Nanostructure Physics and Fabrication, Proceeding of International Symposium on Nanostructure Physics and Fabrication, College Station, TX (Academic Press, New York, NY, 1989) eds. M. A. Reed and W. P. Kirk.
  2. C. G. Bailey, D. V. Forbes, R. P. Raffaelle, S. M. Hubbard; Near 1 V Open Circuit Voltage InAs/GaAs Quantum-dot Solar Cells, Appl. Phys. Lett. 98, 163105 (2011).
  3. Jateen S. Gandhi, Choong-Un Kim, and Wiley P. Kirk, Misfit Management for Reduced Dislocation Formation in Epitaxial Quantum-Dot-Based Devices, J. Crystal Growth 364, 169–177 (2013).


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, February 23-27, 2015


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Jongmin Cho
Department of Radiation Physics
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX
Date:Monday, February 23, 2015
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Use of PET for Proton Therapy Verification and Hybrid Nanoparticles

Abstract:

1) Use of in-room PET for proton therapy verification — Determination of elemental tissue composition and tumor hypoxic region.

Proton therapy, now recognized as one of the most effective treatment of cancer has its great advantage since protons deposit their maximum energy just before coming to a stop. However, current CT scan (tissue electron density) based treatment plans cannot estimate the proton range very accurately. Therefore, proton therapy has a risk of not treating the cancer or damaging critical healthy tissues. In this research, two patients with head-neck cancers were treated using proton therapy and their tissue activation were imaged using an in-room PET scanner. The PET signals were deconvolved to determine the elemental tissue composition. This information can be used to calculate the proton range more accurately and also to determine the tumor hypoxic region.

2) Use of off-site PET for proton therapy verification — Development of proton activated fiducial markers for in-vivo proton therapy/range verification.

18O, 63Cu and 68Zn are strongly activated by low energy protons and decay with positron emissions. These elements were used to develop patient implantable markers which are PET/CT/US/MRI visible. They function as normal radiographic (CT) fiducial (such as gold) markers while providing proton therapy/range verification using PET.

3) Hybrid nanoparticles for radiation therapy and PET mediated molecular imaging.

Gold nanoparticles (GNP) are actively investigated as patient injectable radiosensitizer suitable for clinical use. To achieve effective radiosensitization, it is critical to achieve a sufficient intratumoral GNP uptake and uniform distribution prior to radiation therapy. Therefore, in-vivo imaging of GNP distribution is the focus of many research groups. In this research we developed two hybrid bi-metallic nanoparticles — Zn@Au (Zn core and Au shell) and Cu@Au. When irradiated with protons or alpha particles, the Zn and Cu cores are activated to decay with positron emission with relatively long half-lives. Therefore, PET imaging shows the in-vivo distribution of those injected nanoparticles. These hybrid nanoparticles provide nearly identical radiosensitization as GNPs. After patient injection, their in-vivo distribution can be monitored until the optimal intra-tumoral uptake is achieved and then radiation therapy can be applied for optimal treatment boost.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Speaker:Dr. Can Kilic
Department of Physics
University of Texas
Date:Thursday, February 26, 2015
Time:1:30 PM
Place:106 B Studio Room, Classroom Building, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 365, OU
Title:Aspects of Lepton Flavored Dark Matter

Joint Physics/Chemistry Department Seminar:

Speaker:Dr. Thomas J. Tague, Jr.
Applications Manager, Bruker Optics, Inc.
Date:Thursday, February 26, 2015
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 103
Title:Novel Applications of Molecular Spectroscopy to Heritage and Biomedical Fields of Study

Abstract:

Recent technological advances in key components used in spectroscopic analysis have allowed the application of spectroscopy to samples smaller in size and concentrations than previously possible. Tissue and art samples have been analyzed utilizing these new tools to demonstrate the ability to chemically characterize samples beyond the diffraction limit. For Raman analysis, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has become an important tool for facilitating the transition of spectroscopy to the biomedical and heritage communities. Current western blot and ELISA method analysis techniques have been shown to be inferior with respect to multiplexed analysis and sensitivity when compared to the newly implemented resonance SERS methods.

Note: Refreshments will be served at 3:00 pm in PS 105.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, March 2-6, 2015


APS March Meeting


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, March 9-13, 2015


Physics Colloquium:

Canceled, as speaker was unable to come.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, March 16-20, 2015


Spring Break


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, March 23-27, 2015


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Speaker:Dr. Kaladi S. Babu
Department of Physics
Oklahoma State University
Date:Thursday, March 26, 2015
Time:1:30 PM
Place:106 B Studio Room, Classroom Building, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 365, OU
Title:Neutrino Mass Generation and Its Experimental Tests

Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Brett M. Manning
Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE)
Los Alamos National Laboratory
Date:Thursday, March 26, 2015
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Experiments in Nuclear Physics: Reactions that Power Stars and Protect the Planet

Abstract:

Experimental nuclear physics is a rich field with many applications to basic science, technology and national security.  Low-energy nuclear physics is experiencing tremendous growth with coming advances in the field of radioactive ion beams.  Experimentalists are probing nuclear structure far from stability to better understand nuclear processes in the stars.  Additionally, cutting edge detectors from particle physics are being employed to increase our understanding of fundamental nuclear reactions critical to national security.  A selection of experiments highlighting these advances will be presented.  Special attention will be given to the detectors as well as benefits to the broader community.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


OU/OSU Condensed Matter Physics Seminar:

Speaker:Dr. Binbin Weng
School of Electrical and Computer Engineering
University of Oklahoma
Date:Friday, March 27, 2015
Time:9:30 AM
Place:PS 148 (and room 203 Nielsen Hall, OU)
Title:Exploration and analysis of the room temperature CdS/PbSe mid-infrared heterjunctional detectors

Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, March 30-April 3, 2015


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Min Xiao
Department of Physics
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR
& National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and School of Physics
Nanjing University, Nanjing, China
Date:Thursday, April 2, 2015
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:High-Q Micro-Disk Cavities and their Applications

Abstract:

The whispering gallery modes of micro-disk cavities can have very high quality (Q) factors and small mode volumes, which can interact with single optical emitters and form ideal cavity electrodynamical systems. Such high-Q micro-disk cavities have also been widely used for ultra-sensitive biosensors, low-threshold and narrow linewidth lasers, frequency comb, and cavity optomechanics applications.

When two high-Q micro-cavities are coupled together, interesting mode splitting occurs. With precisely controlled coupling between the two micro-disk cavities, EIT (electromagnetically induced transparency)-like phenomenon can be observed and carefully studied. More interestingly, when one of the micro-toroid cavities has a gain that balances the loss in the other micro-cavity, the novel effect of parity-time (PT) symmetry appears in this system. By making use of the gain saturation nonlinearity in the active micro-cavity, nonreciprocal light transmission can be achieved in this active-passive-coupled micro-cavity system.

In this talk, I will present how such high-Q micro-disk cavities are made and some of their applications.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, April 6-10, 2015


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Speaker:Dr. Satish V. Desai
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Minnesota
Date:Thursday, April 9, 2015
Time:1:30 PM
Place:106 B Studio Room, Classroom Building, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 365, OU
Title:The NOvA Experiment

Abstract:

The NOvA experiment is studying neutrino oscillations using the NuMI neutrino beam produced at Fermilab.  It consists of two functionally identical liquid-scintillator tracking calorimeters, and is optimized for finding electron neutrino appearance in a beam dominated by muon neutrinos.  A near detector, located at Fermilab, is used to characterize the beam before oscillations.  The oscillation parameters are extracted by observing the beam with the far detector 810 km away in northern Minnesota.  In this talk, I will present an overview of the NOvA experiment, review the techniques used to identify and reconstruct neutrino interactions, and describe the expected sensitivity of NOvA.


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Satish V. Desai
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Minnesota
Date:Thursday, April 9, 2015
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:The NOvA Experiment

Abstract:

The 1998 discovery that neutrinos of different flavors oscillate into each other is among the most exciting developments in the recent history of particle physics.  It resolved long-standing anomalies in the flux of neutrinos originating from the sun and produced by the interaction of comic rays in the upper atmosphere.  Neutrino oscillations may also hold the key to a long-standing mystery:  why is there more matter in the universe than anti-matter?  NOvA is the latest in a series of experiments designed to study this phenomenon.  In this talk, I will introduce the concept of neutrino oscillations, present an overview of the NOvA experiment and its expected sensitivity, and touch briefly on future prospects for progress in this field.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, April 13-17, 2015


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Jie Jiang
Department of Physics
Oklahoma State University
Date:Thursday, April 16, 2015
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Antiferromagnetic Spinor Bose–Einstein Condensates in a Two-dimensional Optical Lattice

Abstract:

A spinor Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) confined by optical lattices has become one of the fastest-moving research frontiers in the past fifteen years. Our experimental data have demonstrated a novel quantum phase transition in steady states of lattice-confined spinor BECs, and confirmed an interesting lattice-tuned separatrix in phase space. The steady states are found to depend sigmoidally on the lattice depth and exponentially on the magnetic field, which is very different from a well-known mean-field prediction. We have also introduced a phenomenological model that describes our data without adjustable parameters.

Speaker:Pinghui Lin
Department of Physics
Oklahoma State University
Date:Thursday, April 16, 2015
Time:4:00 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:NMR in Protein Structure Studies

Abstract:

After over 60 years since the first discovery of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), it is still a powerful technique for biophysical and biochemical studies. Elucidating protein structure is the key to understand function. We applied both solid-state and solution NMR to two different protein systems. The first case we show is Perilipin 1 (PLIN1), a membrane protein bound to the single layer lipid membrane in the organelle lipid storage droplet in adipocytes. We combined experimental solid-state NMR data with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the membrane-anchoring motif of this protein and how it is related to its function. In the second case, SHetA2 is a small flexible heteroarotinoid that has shown promising cancer prevention and therapeutic activities. It was shown to be able to bind to heat shock protein 70 family member Mortalin. By applying solution NMR chemical shift perturbation, we demonstrated the binding sites of SHetA2 on Mortalin and how this interaction leads to the disruption of the interaction between Mortalin and its substrate p53 thus leading to cell apoptosis.

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, April 20-24, 2015


Physics Colloquium:

Speaker:Dr. Salvador Barraza-Lopez
Department of Physics
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR
Date:Thursday, April 23, 2015
Time:3:30 PM
Place:PS 110
Title:Got Gauß? Two-Dimensional Materials and Geometry, Once Again

Abstract:

I would never had imagined doing geometry for a living while taking my first course in geometry in high school, and carbon-based materials (fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, graphene) provided my first glimpse of how shape can very well determine materials properties about a decade ago.

In 2002, Saito proposed that one could understand changes in the electronic properties of carbon nanotubes as they couple to structural vibrations (phonons), as if these vibrations were creating electromagnetic fields that electrons on the nanotube felt and responded to.

This idea took a strong resurgence in 2009–2010, when Vozmediano, Katsnelson, Geim and Guinea proposed to create very large (pseudo-)magnetic fields by deforming graphene: The enticing part of their proposal was that fields equivalent to hundreds of Tesla should in principle be achievable on this material; an interesting possibility because most labs have few-Tesla magnets (the largest magnetic fields in a dedicated Lab in Florida reach about 30 Tesla, tops).

By the end of 2011 I had a close look at these theories: The intriguing aspect was that Saito’s and the following theories were all built on a continuum, as if atoms were not there. Something that started as a curiosity and a game with a mechanical engineer friend of mine turned into a few publications, an international Workshop, and the motivation to keep going: The basic idea is that atoms create a valid (discrete) geometry: This discrete geometry then serves as a new foundation to reformulate some of these theories and to correlate materials properties to changes in these materials’ shape.

  1. Discrete differential geometry. Bobenko, Schröder, Sullivan, Ziegler, Eds. Birkhäuser (Basel).
  2. “Strain-engineering of graphene’s electronic structure beyond continuum elasticity.” Barraza-Lopez, Pacheco-Sanjuan, Wang, and Vanevic. Solid State Comm. 166, 70 (2013).
  3. “Quantitative chemistry and the discrete geometry of conformal atom-thin crystals.” Pacheco Sanjuan, Mehboudi, Harriss, Terrones, and Barraza-Lopez. ACS Nano 8, 1136 (2014).
  4. “Strain and the optoelectronic properties of nonplanar phosphorene monolayers.” Mehboudi, Utt, Terrones, Harriss, Pacheco SanJuan, and Barraza-Lopez. PNAS (in press, 2015).

Note: The traditional student-speaker chat will begin in Physical Sciences Room 147 at 3:00 PM. All students are welcome! Refreshments will be served.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, April 27-May 1, 2015


Prefinals Week


Oklahoma High Energy Physics Seminar on Talk-Back Television:

Speaker:Dr. Kirtiman Ghosh
Department of Physics
Oklahoma State University
Date:Thursday, April 30, 2015
Time:1:30 PM
Place:106 B Studio Room, Classroom Building, OSU
& Nielsen Hall, Room 365, OU
Title:Probing Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model with Top-Quarks

Abstract:

Supersymmetry is one of the most interesting theories beyond the Standard Model, solving the hierarchy problem and providing an explanation for Dark Matter (DM). Both the ATLAS and the CMS collaborations pursued a rich search programme to discover Supersymmetry during Run 1 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In absence of any significant deviation of the data from the Standard Model (SM) prediction, stringent limits were placed in some specific supersymmetric models. This talk will present a summary of constraints (from DM relic density, Higgs discovery, low-energy observables and LHC Run 1 data) on a particular variant of supersymmetric model namely, constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (cMSSM). We will also discuss a novel signature for detection of cMSSM at the LHC Run 2.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, May 4-8, 2015


Finals Week

No talks scheduled.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, May 11-15, 2015



Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, May 18-22, 2015


1st OSU Biophysics Symposium on Protein Structure, Dynamics & Function:

348B Noble Research Center, May 21st, 2015

Hosted by the Departments of Physics, Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Microbiology, Oklahoma State University

Keynote speaker: Professor Wei Wang, Nanjing University, China

Time: Speaker: Title:
8:30Dr. Aihua Xie
Physics, OSU
Symposium opening
8:35Dr. Wei Wang
Nanjing U, China
From protein complexity simplification
to protein folding and aggregation
9:10Dr. Smita Mohanty
Chemistry, OSU
Congenital disorders of glycosylation:
Mechanisms of oligosaccharyltransferase function
9:35Dr. Wenfei Li
Nanjing U, China
Folding of allosteric proteins:
Lessons from molecular simulations on calmodulin
10:00Coffee break and posters
11:00Dr. Donghua Zhou
Physics, OSU
Membrane protein structures by solid-state NMR
and MD simulation
11:25Dr. Han Bao
Micobiology, OSU
Mutations disturbing water cluster alter the kinetics
of the steps of water oxidation in photosystem II
11:40Dr. Aihua Xie
Physics, OSU
Developments and applications of
infrared structural biology
12:05Dr. Yingxia Hu
Biochemistry, OSU
The structure of a prophenoloxidase from the mosquito,
Anopheles gambiae provides new insights
into the mechanism of PPO activation
12:20Dr. Wouter Hoff
Microbiology, OSU
Symposium closing

Contact person: Dr. Smita Mohanty, Department of Chemistry. Email: Smita.Mohanty@okstate.edu.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, May 25-29, 2015


No talks scheduled.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, June 1-4, 2015


No talks scheduled.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, June 8-12, 2015



Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, June 15-19, 2015


No talks scheduled.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, June 22-26, 2015


No talks scheduled.


Oklahoma State Physics Department

Seminars and Colloquia, June 29-July 3, 2015


No talks scheduled.


Last Updated:

jhhp@jperk.phy.okstate.edu